Between Concept and Metaphor: Reviewing Nietzsche’s Doctrine of Truth
International Journal of Philosophy
Volume 1, Issue 1, June 2013, Pages: 6-20
Received: Mar. 2, 2013; Published: Jun. 20, 2013
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Author
Altaf Hossain, Jahangirnagar University, Dhaka-1342, Bangladesh
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Abstract
For centuries, humankind accepts truth to be something static and global but Nietzsche has famously argued that truth is a metaphor and for that matter changeable and perennially evolving. As I hope to show here, this radical view has resulted out of Nietzsche’s meta-commentary on language and logic. The main purpose of this article is to examine the key points of Nietzsche’s arguments and the soundness of their conclusions, and thereby bring out their underlying critical intent.
Keywords
Nietzsche, Metaphor, Concept, Opposional Thinking, Truth of Becoming
To cite this article
Altaf Hossain, Between Concept and Metaphor: Reviewing Nietzsche’s Doctrine of Truth, International Journal of Philosophy. Vol. 1, No. 1, 2013, pp. 6-20. doi: 10.11648/j.ijp.20130101.12
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