Stoicism and Virtue: The Intrinsic Relationship
International Journal of Philosophy
Volume 3, Issue 6, December 2015, Pages: 52-56
Received: Sep. 24, 2015; Accepted: Oct. 9, 2015; Published: Oct. 30, 2015
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Author
Kuangfei Xie, Humanity and Politics Department, Nanjing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nan Jing, China
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Abstract
Stoicism provides the practical wisdom of happiness to the modern people. Stoicism can also provide us with the essential source of moral power for the virtues. Both the private virtues and the public virtues are deeply rooted into the Stoicism principles that the moral agents have the ultimate moral freedom of choosing, regardless of the changes of the outer circumstances. To effectively build the virtues, we need to effectively distinguish between what is up to us and what is not up to us. Stoicism has greatly enlightened the development of virtue ethics from two fundamental aspects. On the one hand, Stoicism tells us that we need to make the best use of what is in our own power so that we can truly live the fully virtuous life. On the other hand, Stoicism lets us know that we need to accept what inevitably will happen to us with dignity and a peaceful mind. The Stoicism has also emphasized the importance and value of the freedom of moral choice, which means the innate and firm soul force that can exercise the practical wisdom of life, regardless of the changes of outer circumstances.
Keywords
Stoicism, Virtue, Happiness
To cite this article
Kuangfei Xie, Stoicism and Virtue: The Intrinsic Relationship, International Journal of Philosophy. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2015, pp. 52-56. doi: 10.11648/j.ijp.20150306.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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