Virtue Ethics and Emotions
International Journal of Philosophy
Volume 3, Issue 6, December 2015, Pages: 57-61
Received: Nov. 24, 2015; Accepted: Dec. 3, 2015; Published: Dec. 30, 2015
Views 5618      Downloads 140
Author
Kuangfei Xie, Humanity and Politics Department of Nanjing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, China
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
The emotional dimension of virtues has long been marginalized and even entirely neglected, with too much importance having being attached to the rational dimension of virtues. Emotions constitute the fundamental basis of virtues, supplying endless inner driving force to the formation of virtues. By putting more stress to the cultivation of moral emotions, the effectiveness of moral education in the schools will be dramatically improved and enhanced.
Keywords
Virtue Ethics, Virtues, Emotions
To cite this article
Kuangfei Xie, Virtue Ethics and Emotions, International Journal of Philosophy. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2015, pp. 57-61. doi: 10.11648/j.ijp.20150306.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
[1]
Daniel Statman: Virtue Ethics, a Critical Reader, Published by Georgetown Univetsity Press, Washington, D.C, 1997,
[2]
Confucius: the Analects, Translated by Yang Bojun, D.C. Lau, Published by Zhonghua Book Company, 2008, p. 3.
[3]
Alasdair MacIntyre: After Virtue, Second Edition 1984, Published by University of Notre Dame Press , Notre Dame, Indiana, p. 2.
[4]
Great Traditions In Ethics, Fifth Edition, Edited by Ethel M. Albert, Theodore C. Denise, Sheldon P. Peterfreund, Published By Wadsworth, Inc. 1984, p. 186. Even after the virtues have been successfully cultivated, emotions are still needed to further strengthen and solidify the virtues, after all, just like the plants and flowers, without the proper watering and sunshine, the virtues also tend to wither.
[5]
Youlan Feng: A Short History of Chinese Philosophy, Published By Jiangsu China Publishing Company, 2012.
[6]
Writings On Ethics, Classical and Contemporary, edited by Joseph Katz, Published by D. Van Nostrand Company, Inc, 1962, p.11
[7]
XinZhong Yao: An Introduction to Confucianism, Published by Cambridge University Press, 2006, p.284.
[8]
The Basic Writings of Chuang Tzu, Translated by Burton Watson, Published by Columbia University Press, 1996, p.26.
[9]
Zhu Hsi: Learning to Be a Sage, Translated by Daniel K. Gardner, Published by University of California Press, 1990, p.57.
[10]
Xun zi, Basic Writing, Translated by Burton Watson, Published by Columbia University Press, 2003, p.25.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186