Does Pythagoreanism Really Belong to Greek?
International Journal of Philosophy
Volume 4, Issue 2, April 2016, Pages: 7-10
Received: Dec. 31, 2015; Accepted: Feb. 3, 2016; Published: Apr. 27, 2016
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Author
Sunkanna Velpula, Department of Philosophy, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, India
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Abstract
Pythagoras of Samos was the founder of the religious movement called Pythagoreanism and also well known Philosopher and mathematician. We have very little reliable information about Pythagoras from the secondary sources because he personally wrote nothing though hecould inspire legends. That is why Aristotle also often referred to the Pythagoreans but not to Pythagoras as such. Historically Pythagoras is being treated as the first mathematician, the first philosopher and the first metempsychosist. But there are certain doubts on the authorship of Pythagoreanism. Is it really proposed by Pythagoras? Some believes that he was not the author of Pythagoreanism because the Pythagorean principle was very much present in 10th century BC in China and 9th century BB in India. This paper examines the evidences and tries to analyze the authorship of Pythagoreanism.
Keywords
Pythagoreanism, Divine-Fire, Divine-One, Bhāskara, Śulbasūtras, Baudhāyana, Orphic
To cite this article
Sunkanna Velpula, Does Pythagoreanism Really Belong to Greek?, International Journal of Philosophy. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2016, pp. 7-10. doi: 10.11648/j.ijp.20160402.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
[1]
Metempsychosis is a philosophical term in the Greek language referring to transmigration of the Soul.
[2]
Roy Kenneth Hack, God in Greek Philosophy To the Time of Socrates (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1969), p. 48.
[3]
Ibid, p. 50.
[4]
Ibid, p. 53.
[5]
Ibid, p. 53.
[6]
William Edward Hartpole Lecky, History of European Morals from Augustus to Charlemagne, Vol. 1(New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1869), p. 347.
[7]
Charles H. Kahn, Pythagoras and Pythagoreans: A Brief History (Indianapolis/Cambridge: Hackett Publishing Company, Inc. 2001), p. 147.
[8]
Raymond Martin & John Barresi, The Rise and the fall of Soul and Self (New York: Columbia University Press, 2008), p. 10.
[9]
William Edward Hartpole Lecky, History of European morals from Augustus to Charlemagne, Vol. 1 (New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1869), p. 109.
[10]
Ibid, p. 167.
[11]
Eli Maor, The Pythagorean Theorem (Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2007), p. xi.
[12]
It was translated into English as “Nine Chapters on the Mathematical Art.”
[13]
Eli Maor, The Pythagorean Theorem (Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2007), p. 64.
[14]
Frank J. Swetz and T. I. Kao. Was Pythagoras Chinese? (University Park: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 1988), p. 66.
[15]
Ibid, p. 14.
[16]
Ibid, p. 14.
[17]
Eli Maor, The Pythagorean Theorem (Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2007), p. 67.
[18]
Paul Strathern, Pythagoras & his Theorem (London: Arrow, 1997), p. 23.
[19]
Edward Pococke, India in Greece; or, Truth in Mythology (London: John J. Griffin and Co., 1852), p. 353.
[20]
Ibid, p. 363.
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