Adaptation in Foreign Policy of Singapore Towards ASEAN
Humanities and Social Sciences
Volume 3, Issue 5, September 2015, Pages: 240-248
Received: Nov. 26, 2015; Published: Nov. 26, 2015
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Anna Grzywacz, Faculty of Business and International Relations, Vistula University, Warsaw, Poland
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Abstract
Singapore is one of the most important countries in Asia-Pacific region and one of the most powerful in Southeast Asia. Singapore serves as leader in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). The analysis uses the political adaptation theoretical framework to analyze Singaporean activity. The paper attempts to answer the question what is the political strategy adopted by Singapore in its activity in the ASEAN? The purpose of the analysis is to verify the argument that adaptation policy of Singapore may be characterized by its creativity, what means that the state seeks to adapt to changes in the international environment. At the same time the state attempts to shape the international system.
Keywords
Adaptation, Foreign Policy, Singapore, ASEAN
To cite this article
Anna Grzywacz, Adaptation in Foreign Policy of Singapore Towards ASEAN, Humanities and Social Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 5, 2015, pp. 240-248. doi: 10.11648/j.hss.20150305.22
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