Compatibility of Ethiopia’s Import Regulation of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) with WTO Rules
Humanities and Social Sciences
Volume 3, Issue 6, November 2015, Pages: 286-292
Received: Oct. 7, 2015; Accepted: Oct. 26, 2015; Published: Dec. 7, 2015
Views 3572      Downloads 119
Authors
Gizachew Girma, College of Law, Dire Dawa University, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia
Zemenu Yesigat, College of Law, Dire Dawa University, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
Ethiopia- a party to CPB- needs to benefit from the advantages of modern biotechnology, by managing the possible risks occasioned as a result of the application of the technology on human and animal health, biological diversity and the environment. In an attempt to implement the obligations under the protocol, the country promulgated Biosafety proclamation and Directives which regulate among other things import of GMOs. As Ethiopia is on the way to join the WTO, compatibility of the legal system with WTO rules that would otherwise affect international trade has paramount importance either to facilitate the accession or to prevent future trade disputes before the WTO dispute settlement body. And hence, the purpose of this paper is to explore the regulatory framework of import regulation of GMOs in Ethiopia and to assess its compatibility with WTO rules- namely SPS, TBT and GATT agreements.
Keywords
Import Regulation, Ethiopia, WTO, SPS, TBT, GATT, GMO
To cite this article
Gizachew Girma, Zemenu Yesigat, Compatibility of Ethiopia’s Import Regulation of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) with WTO Rules, Humanities and Social Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2015, pp. 286-292. doi: 10.11648/j.hss.20150306.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
[1]
Aaron A. Ostrovsky, 2004, the EC Regulations for GMO and the Current WTO Dispute -Human Health or Environmental Measures? 15 COLO. J. INT'L ENVTL. L. & POL'Y 209.
[2]
Daniele Manzella& Jessica Vapnek, 2007, Development of an analytical tool to assess Biosecurity legislation, FAO LEGISLATIVE STUDY 96, Rome.
[3]
Matthew Stilwell And Brennan Van Dyke, 1999, An Activist’s Handbook On Genetically Modified Organisms And The WTO, Second Edition.
[4]
EFDR Biosafety proclamation No. 655/2009, Federal Negarit Gazeta (Page 4962- 4975), 15th Year No. 63, Addis Ababa, 2009.
[5]
Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety to the Convention on Biological Diversity, Feb. 23, 2000.
[6]
WTO Legal Texts Result of the Uruguay Round Final Text, e-leg-gen-5. doc; Annex 1A of the Marrakech Agreement Multilateral Agreements on Trade in Goods, General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 1994 ("GATT1994").
[7]
WTO Legal Texts Result of the Uruguay Round Final Text, e-leg-sps-14.doc; Annex 1A of the Marrakech Agreement, Multilateral Agreements on Trade in Goods, agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures.
[8]
WTO Legal Texts Result of the Uruguay Round Final Text, e-leg-tbt-16. doc; Annex 1A of the Marrakech Agreement, Multilateral Agreements on Trade in Goods, Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade.
[9]
WTO, Report of the Appellate Body, European Communities -- Measures Affecting Asbestos and Asbestos Containing Products, WT/DS135/AB/R (Mar. 2001).
[10]
WTO, Report of the Appellate Body, European Communities -- Trade Description of Sardines, WT/DS231/AB/R (Sept. 2002).
[11]
WTO, Report of the Panel, European Communities - Measures Affecting the Approval and Marketing of Biotech Products, WT/DS291/R, (Sept. 2002).
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186