A Study on Cross-Cultural Adaptation of Mainland Chinese Students in Taiwan from the Perspective of Self-Identity
Humanities and Social Sciences
Volume 6, Issue 1, January 2018, Pages: 30-37
Received: May 10, 2018; Published: May 11, 2018
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Authors
Shen Chingcheng, Institute of Tourism Management, National Kaohsiung University of Hospitality and Tourism, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
Chang Teyi, Institute of Tourism Management, National Kaohsiung University of Hospitality and Tourism, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
Li Zhiwei, Institute of Tourism Management, National Kaohsiung University of Hospitality and Tourism, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
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Abstract
At present, there are a total of 9462 mainland Chinese students with formal degrees in Taiwan. There are a large number of mainland students studying in Taiwan, but there are few studies on their adaptation to life and learning in Taiwan. This study takes the view of self-identity, to explore the cross-cultural adaptation of mainland students in Taiwan, this study conducted in-depth interviews with 7 mainland students from the National Kaohsiung University of Hospitality and Tourism by means of qualitative research and literature Review. The factors of cross-cultural adaptation divided into life adaptation, cultural adaptation, learning adaptation, interactive adaptation and leisure adaptation. A total of 204 valid questionnaires were received, and structural equation model analysis was carried out with SPSS22 and LISREL852. The results showed that the view of self-identity could be divided into value identity, social identity, group identity and personality identity,the value identity point of view is the most important. Secondly, self-identity view has positive and significant effects on life adaptation, cultural adaptation, learning adaptation, interactive adaptation and leisure adaptation. Self-identity view can be divided into high self-identity group, middle self-identity group and low self-identity group, while high self-identity view has high cross-cultural adaptation. Finally, in life adaptation, mainland students are more concerned with the consumption environment, medical care and entertainment, transportation and related living facilities; in learning adaptation, mainland student pays more attention to language and writing; in interactive adaptation, mainland student pays more attention to the interaction of administrative personnel. This study puts forward relevant suggestions, hoping to arouse the attention of Taiwan authorities and enrollment schools, achieve convergence management, and also hope to provide reference and reference for the vast number of mainland students to apply for study in Taiwan.
Keywords
Mainland Chinese Students, Cross-Cultural Adaptation, Self-Identity
To cite this article
Shen Chingcheng, Chang Teyi, Li Zhiwei, A Study on Cross-Cultural Adaptation of Mainland Chinese Students in Taiwan from the Perspective of Self-Identity, Humanities and Social Sciences. Vol. 6, No. 1, 2018, pp. 30-37. doi: 10.11648/j.hss.20180601.15
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