Primordial Patterns of Security and Social Control System in Ilogbo Ekiti, Nigeria
Humanities and Social Sciences
Volume 6, Issue 3, May 2018, Pages: 88-96
Received: Dec. 10, 2016; Accepted: Nov. 1, 2017; Published: Jul. 10, 2018
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Author
Johnson Olusegun Ajayi, Department of Sociology, Ekiti State University, Faculty of the Social Sciences, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria
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Abstract
No matter how small a community is, ancient or modern, there is bound to be a system of keeping the community secure from external aggression or internal crises. Since peace and advancement can only be guaranteed in a safe environment, this is why the need arises to keep the community secure. The study examines the primordial pattern of security maintenance and the social control system in Ilogbo-Ekiti, with a view to seeing how some of the old pattern of keeping the community save could be integrated into the modern pattern for more efficient and effective protection of human community. The paper hinged the study on social control and labelling theories while secondary data were collected through Focus Group Discussion (FGD) and Key Informant Interview (KII). The paper concludes that some of the primordial patterns of crime control can be highly effective in keeping the environment safe and secure if properly harnessed and re-engineered.
Keywords
Community, Security, Primordial, Safety, Social Control
To cite this article
Johnson Olusegun Ajayi, Primordial Patterns of Security and Social Control System in Ilogbo Ekiti, Nigeria, Humanities and Social Sciences. Vol. 6, No. 3, 2018, pp. 88-96. doi: 10.11648/j.hss.20180603.11
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Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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