Genotypes by Environment Interaction of Faba Bean (Viciafaba L.) Grain Yield in the Highland of Bale Zone, Southeastern Ethiopia
Plant
Volume 5, Issue 1, January 2017, Pages: 13-17
Received: Oct. 6, 2016; Accepted: Oct. 19, 2016; Published: Nov. 23, 2016
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Authors
Tadele Tadesse, Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Sinana Agricultural Research Center, Bale-Robe, Ethiopia
Behailu Mulugeta, Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Sinana Agricultural Research Center, Bale-Robe, Ethiopia
Gashaw Sefera, Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Sinana Agricultural Research Center, Bale-Robe, Ethiopia
Amanuel Tekalign, Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Sinana Agricultural Research Center, Bale-Robe, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Faba bean (Viciafaba L.) is widely cultivated in Ethiopia next to China. Faba bean (Viciafaba L.) is a partially Allogamous grain legumes grown for its high protein content in seed. The edible protein in the seed is used for human and animal consumption. The crop contributes to soil fertility through biological N-fixation. Though it is grows in many part of the country, the national average yield is very low due to multiple factors such as limited availability of stable high yielding and disease resistant cultivar. To this end, an experiment was conducted at Sinana, Agarfa, Adaba and Sinja for two years (2013-2014) to investigate the genotype x environment interaction and identify stable high yielding genotypes. Fifteen genotypes including the improved and local checks were grown in RCBD. Additive main effects and multiplicative interaction (AMMI) analysis was used to estimate genotype x environment interaction and found to be significant (P<0.01). The principal components (IPCA1) and (IPCA 2) explained 52.8% and 47.2% of the interaction, respectively. Mean grain yield of genotypes ranged from 2.6t/ha to 4.2t/ha with grand mean of 3.3t/ha. Most of the genotypes were highly responsive to the testing environment and adapted to more favorable environments. Genotype EH03014-1 and EKLS01013-1 gave higher grain yield than the checks, showed linear regression coefficient close to unity and deviation from regression close to zero. This implied that the two candidate genotypes showed stable performance across locations. Furthermore, EH03014-1 and EKLS01013-1 are resistant to major disease and showed20.41% and 14.58% grain yield advantage over the standard check, respectively. Based on their performance across locations, stability parameters, and their yield advantage over the checks, these two genotypes were selected as candidate varieties for verification in the coming bona 2016/17 cropping season.
Keywords
Genotypes X Environment Interaction, AMMI, Stability Parameters, ASV
To cite this article
Tadele Tadesse, Behailu Mulugeta, Gashaw Sefera, Amanuel Tekalign, Genotypes by Environment Interaction of Faba Bean (Viciafaba L.) Grain Yield in the Highland of Bale Zone, Southeastern Ethiopia, Plant. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2017, pp. 13-17. doi: 10.11648/j.plant.20170501.13
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Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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