Toxicological Study of the Seed Extracts from Dodonaea madagascariensis Radlk (Sapindaceae), a Malagasy Medicinal Plant
Journal of Plant Sciences
Volume 3, Issue 6, December 2015, Pages: 303-309
Received: Oct. 26, 2015; Accepted: Nov. 4, 2015; Published: Nov. 19, 2015
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Authors
Mihajasoa Stella Razanatseheno, Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry to Medical Sciences, Fundamental and Applied Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Sciences, University of Antananarivo, Antananarivo, Madagascar
Clara Fredeline Rajemiarimoelisoa, Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Antananarivo, Antananarivo, Madagascar
Zoarilala Rinah Razafindrakoto, Malagasy Institute for Applied Research (IMRA), Antananarivo, Madagascar
David Ramanitrahasimbola, Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Antananarivo, Antananarivo, Madagascar
Danielle Aurore Doll Rakoto, Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry to Medical Sciences, Fundamental and Applied Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Sciences, University of Antananarivo, Antananarivo, Madagascar
Hanitra Ranjana Randrianarivo, Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry to Medical Sciences, Fundamental and Applied Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Sciences, University of Antananarivo, Antananarivo, Madagascar
Victor Louis Jeannoda, Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry to Medical Sciences, Fundamental and Applied Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Sciences, University of Antananarivo, Antananarivo, Madagascar
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Abstract
This work was designed to study the seed toxicity of Dodonaea madagascariensis Radlk. (Sapindaceae), an endemic plant to Madagascar with multiple medicinal uses. Using different experimental models of animals, seed methanolic extract of D. madagascariensis (SMED) was found to be toxic to mice (LD50 of 36.12 mg/ kg by intraperitoneal route), chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus), juvenile fishes (Cyprinus carpio) (LC50 of 4.33 µg/mL) and frog tadpoles (Ptychadena mascareniensis) (LC50 of 5.41 µg/mL). Toxicity was ascribed to saponin group only. In mice, SMED developed different symptoms when administered by intraperitoneal, subcutaneous and oral routes. Trailing of the posterior limbs, low body posture, tremors, ataxia, abdominal breathing and at high dose, diarrhea were the most common occurring symptoms. In acute and subchronic administrations, SMED caused damages in the liver, kidneys, lungs, small and large intestines while brain, heart and stomach were not affected. No significant changes on serum concentration of ASAT, ALAT and creatinine were observed after oral subchronic exposure (30 days) to SMED at 12.71 mg/kg. SMED exerted a positive inotropic effect on isolated guinea pig atria at 12.5 µg/mL and had a hemolytic activity. In the light of these preliminary results, the toxicity of D. madagascariensis seeds could be used in the control of harmful cold blooded animals.
Keywords
Dodonaea madagascariensis, Seed Methanolic Extract, Saponins, Toxicity, Histopathological Lesions, Biochemical Parameters
To cite this article
Mihajasoa Stella Razanatseheno, Clara Fredeline Rajemiarimoelisoa, Zoarilala Rinah Razafindrakoto, David Ramanitrahasimbola, Danielle Aurore Doll Rakoto, Hanitra Ranjana Randrianarivo, Victor Louis Jeannoda, Toxicological Study of the Seed Extracts from Dodonaea madagascariensis Radlk (Sapindaceae), a Malagasy Medicinal Plant, Journal of Plant Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2015, pp. 303-309. doi: 10.11648/j.jps.20150306.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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