Genetic Diversity Analysis and DNA Fingerprinting of Mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) Genotypes Using SSR Markers
Journal of Plant Sciences
Volume 4, Issue 6, December 2016, Pages: 153-164
Received: Oct. 13, 2016; Accepted: Oct. 31, 2016; Published: Nov. 23, 2016
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Authors
Md. Rezwan Molla, Molecular Biology Laboratory, Plant Genetic Resources Centre, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI), Gazipur, Bangladesh
Iftekhar Ahmed, Molecular Biology Laboratory, Plant Genetic Resources Centre, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI), Gazipur, Bangladesh
Md. Motiar Rohman, Molecular Breeding Laboratory, Plant Breeding Division, BARI, Gazipur, Bangladesh
Md. Amjad Hossain, Molecular Biology Laboratory, Plant Genetic Resources Centre, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI), Gazipur, Bangladesh
Md. Aziz Zilani Chowdhury, Crops Division, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Council (BARC), Farmgate, Dhaka, Bangladesh
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Abstract
Microsatellite combines several features of an ultimate molecular marker and they are used increasingly in various plant genetic studies and applications. Characterization of mungbean genotypes on the basis of DNA fingerprinting has become an efficient tool to link genotypic variation. This work is reporting the utilization of a small set of five previously developed mungbean microsatellite (SSR) markers for the identification and discrimination of six HYVs and 36 landraces. All five microsatellite markers were found to be polymorphic. Variation was found in number of alleles, allele frequency, observed and expected heterozygosity. Using five primers across 42 genotypes a total of 20 alleles with an average number of 4 alleles per locus were found of which GBssr-MB91 showed highest number of alleles (6) (size ranging from 135 to 152 bp) followed by 4 alleles (from 160 to 176 bp and 175 to 195 bp) and 3 alleles (from 264 to 282 bp and 283 to 304 bp) were detected at the loci LR7322B, LR7323A, LR7323B and GBssr-MB77, respectively. The narrow genetic base could be one of the reasons for the low yield of polymorphic markers in the study. The primer GBssr-MB91 also yielded highest number of PIC value (0.803). Genetic differentiation (Fst) values were found in the ranges 0.443 to 0.747 with an average of 0.686 and gene flow (Nm) values ranged from 0.085 to 0.314 with an average of 0.237. Over all Nei’s genetic distance value (D) obdervedfrom nil to 2.706 among 861accessions pair resulting as a means of permutation combination of 42 mungbean genotypes. The UPGMA dendogram based on Nei’s genetic distance separated the genotypes, BARI mung-1 and BD6906 from other 40 genotype. Out of 42 genotypes, 36 genotypes were identified with at least one and/or combination of 4 primers.
Keywords
DNA Fingerprinting, Genetic Diversity, Microsatellite (SSR) Marker, Mungbean, Polymorphism
To cite this article
Md. Rezwan Molla, Iftekhar Ahmed, Md. Motiar Rohman, Md. Amjad Hossain, Md. Aziz Zilani Chowdhury, Genetic Diversity Analysis and DNA Fingerprinting of Mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) Genotypes Using SSR Markers, Journal of Plant Sciences. Vol. 4, No. 6, 2016, pp. 153-164. doi: 10.11648/j.jps.20160406.14
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Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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