Genetic Diversity in Pigeon Pea (Cajanuscajan (L.) Millspaugh Germplasm Revealed by Gel Electrophoresis of the Seed Proteins
Journal of Plant Sciences
Volume 5, Issue 2, April 2017, Pages: 48-55
Received: Sep. 8, 2016; Accepted: Feb. 7, 2017; Published: Mar. 14, 2017
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Authors
Agbolade James Oludare, Department of Plant Science and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Federal University Oye-Ekiti, Oye-Ekiti, Nigeria
Adekoya Modinat Adejoke, Department of Plant Science and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Federal University Oye-Ekiti, Oye-Ekiti, Nigeria
David Oyinade Aderoju, Department of Plant Science and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Federal University Oye-Ekiti, Oye-Ekiti, Nigeria
Chukwuma Deborah Moradeke, Department of Plant Science and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Federal University Oye-Ekiti, Oye-Ekiti, Nigeria
Komolafe Ronke Justina, Department of Plant Science and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Federal University Oye-Ekiti, Oye-Ekiti, Nigeria
Olaiya Aderonke Eunice, Department of Plant Science and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Federal University Oye-Ekiti, Oye-Ekiti, Nigeria
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Abstract
Ten accessions of Pigeon pea (Cajanuscajan) obtained from National Centre for Genetic Resources and Biotechnology (NACGRAB), Ibadan, Oyo state, were assessed for their genetic and phylogenetic relatedness through electrophoretic analysis of the seed proteins. 0.2g of the seeds were weighed and macerated with mortar and pestle in 0.2M phosphate buffer containing 0.133M of acid (NaH2PO4) and 0.067 of base (Na2HPO4) at pH 6.5. Protein characterization with standard marker revealed that the seeds of the ten accessions contained proteins (B.S.A, Oval Albumin, Pepsinogen, Trypsinogen and Lysozyme) with molecular weights ranging from 66kda and above, 45 – 65 kDa, 44 – 33 kda, 32-24 kDa and 23-14 kDa, respectively. The student T-test revealed that accessions PP2, PP3, PP5, PP6, PP8 and PP9 have molecular weights not significantly different from one another (P<0.05) while samples PP1, PP4 and PP7 showed significantly different values (P>0.05). All the accessions had at least two proteins and two major bands in common. The study revealed intra-specific similarities and genetic diversity in protein contents among the ten accessions of pigeon pea (Cajanuscajan).
Keywords
Accessions, Gel Electrophoresis, Intra-Specific, Germplasm, Genetic Diversity
To cite this article
Agbolade James Oludare, Adekoya Modinat Adejoke, David Oyinade Aderoju, Chukwuma Deborah Moradeke, Komolafe Ronke Justina, Olaiya Aderonke Eunice, Genetic Diversity in Pigeon Pea (Cajanuscajan (L.) Millspaugh Germplasm Revealed by Gel Electrophoresis of the Seed Proteins, Journal of Plant Sciences. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2017, pp. 48-55. doi: 10.11648/j.jps.20170502.11
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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