Assessment on the Use, Knowledge and Conservation of Medicinal Plants in Selected Kebeles of Dire Dawa Administration, Eastern Ethiopia
Journal of Plant Sciences
Volume 5, Issue 2, April 2017, Pages: 56-64
Received: Jan. 13, 2017; Accepted: Feb. 4, 2017; Published: Mar. 14, 2017
Views 2365      Downloads 190
Authors
Atinafu Kebede, Department of Biology, Dire Dawa University, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia
Shimels Ayalew, Department of Biology, Dire Dawa University, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia
Akalu Mesfin, Department of Biology, Dire Dawa University, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia
Getachew Mulualem, Ethiopian Biodiversity Institute, Mekele Center, Mekele, Ethiopia
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess and document the indigenous knowledge of medicinal plants used in the communities and preserve it to be used by the next generations. Ten study sites (kebeles) were selected based on a reconnaissance survey and recommendations of elders and local authorities. The study was carried out in two different seasons, from September to November, 2014 and from June to August, 2015. Eighty informants including twenty traditional herbalists (as key informants) participated in the study. Semi-structured interviews, group discussions and guided field walk constituted the main data collection methods. Techniques of Preference Ranking, Informant consensus Factor, Fidelity level index and Pearson correlation were employed in data analysis. Medicinal plant specimens were collected identified and kept at the National Herbarium (ETH) of Addis Ababa University. A total of 129 plant species in 61 families and 109 genera constituting herbs (50%), trees (24%), shrubs (23%) and climbers (3%) were reported in the treatment of various health problems. Family Fabaceae was dominant representing 8.5 % of the plant species documented. Leaves (29.4 %) were the most frequently used parts in preparing herbal remedies. Crushing (29 %) and oral route (61%) were commonly used methods of herbal remedy preparation and administration, respectively. Health conditions grouped in 22 categories were treated using medicinal plants. Informant consensus factor was highest for mental illness, poisonous animal bite and head ache and fatigue that had ICF values of 1, 0.61 and 0.60, respectively. Sphaeranthus suaveolens, Barleria orbicularis, Solanum sepiculum and Cadaba farinosa had a fidelity level of 100% this indicated their outstanding preference for treating mental illness, snake bite and swollen body part (GOFLA). There was a positive correlation (r =0.48) between the age of informants and the number of species reported by the informants. However, there was a negative correlation (r = -0.26) between the number of species reported and informants’ educational level. The present paper represents significant ethnobotanical information on medical plants which provides baseline data for future pharmacological and phytochemical studies.
Keywords
Dire Dawa Administration, Human Aliments, Traditional Medicine, Local Communities
To cite this article
Atinafu Kebede, Shimels Ayalew, Akalu Mesfin, Getachew Mulualem, Assessment on the Use, Knowledge and Conservation of Medicinal Plants in Selected Kebeles of Dire Dawa Administration, Eastern Ethiopia, Journal of Plant Sciences. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2017, pp. 56-64. doi: 10.11648/j.jps.20170502.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
[1]
Abdurhman N (2010). Ethnobotanical Study of Medicinal Plants Used by Local People in OflaWereda, Southern Zone of Tigray Region, Ethiopia M. Sc. Thesis. Addis Ababa University. Addis Ababa.
[2]
Abera B. (2014). Medicinal plants used in traditional medicine by Oromo people, Ghimbi District, Southwest Ethiopia. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 10: 40.
[3]
Alemayehu, G. Asfaw Z., Kelbessa, E (2015). Ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants used by local communities of Minjar-Shenkora District, North Shewa Zone of Amhara Region, Ethiopia. Journal of Medicinal Plants Studies, 3(6): 01-11.
[4]
Asfaw Z (2001) Conservation and Sustainable Use of Medicinal Plants in Ethiopia. In Proceedings of the National Workshop on Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Use of Medicinal Plants in Ethiopia. Edited by Medhin Z, Abebe D. Addis Ababa: Institute of Biodiversity Conservation (IBC).
[5]
Awas T. (2007). Plant Diversity in Western Ethiopia: Ecology, Ethnobotany and Conservation. PhD Dissertation, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Oslo, Norway.
[6]
Bekalo T, Demissew S, Asfaw Z (2009). An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants used by local people in the lowlands of konta special oreda, southern nations, nationalities and peoples regional state, Ethiopia. J EthnobiolEthnomed, 5: 26.
[7]
Bekele E, (2007). Study on Actual Situations of Medicinal Plants in Ethiopia Prepared for Japan Association for international Collaboration of Agriculture and Forestry. Pp. 1-76.
[8]
Belayneh A; Asfaw Z; Demissew S; Bussa N (2012). Medicinal plants potential and use by pastoral and agro-pastoral communities in Erer Valley of BabileWereda, Eastern Ethiopia. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 8: 42.
[9]
Belayneh and Bussa (2014). Ethnomedicinal plants used to treat humanailments in the prehistoric place of Harla and Dengego valleys, eastern Ethiopia. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 10: 18.
[10]
Birhanu T., Abera D., Ejeta E (2015). Ethnobotanical study of Medicinal Plants in Selected HorroGudurruWoredas, Western Ethiopia. Journal of Biology, Agriculture and Healthcare, 5 (1).
[11]
Bonet A, Parada M, Selga A, Valle's J (1999). Studies on pharmaceutical ethnobotany in the regions of L'AltEmporda' and Les Guilleries (Catalonia, Iberian Peninsula). J Ethnopharmacoogyl, 68 (1): 145-168.
[12]
Cotton, C. M. (1996). Ethnobotany: Principles and Applications. John Wiley and Sons, New York, 412pp.
[13]
Enyew A, Asfaw Z, Kelbessa E and Nagappan R (2014). Ethnobotanical Study of Traditional Medicinal Plants in and Around Fiche District, Central Ethiopia. Current Research Journal of Biological Sciences 6 (4): 154-167.
[14]
Friedman J, Zohara Y, Amotz D, Palewitch D (1986). A preliminary classification of the healing potential of medicinal plants, based on a rational analysis of an ethnopharmacological field survey among Bedouins in the Negev Desert, Israel. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 16: 275-278.
[15]
Gazzaneo S, Lucena P, Albuquerque P (2005). Knowledge and use of medicinal plants by local specialists in a region of Atlantic Forest in the state of Pernambuco (Northeastern Brazil). J Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 1: 9.
[16]
Gebre G (2005). Ethnobotanical Study of Medicinal Plants in the Konso special Woreda (SNNPR). Ethiopia. M. Sc. thesis: Addis Ababa University.
[17]
Getaneh S. and Girma Z, (2014). An ethinobotanical study of medicinal plants in DebreLibanosWereda, Central Ethiopia. African journal plant science, 8 (7): 366-379.
[18]
Giday M, Asfaw Z, Elmqvist T, Woldu Z (2003). An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants used by the Zay people in Ethiopia. J Ethnopharmacology, 85 (1): 43-52.
[19]
Giday M, Asfaw Z, Woldu Z (2009). Medicinal plants of the Meinit ethnic group of Ethiopia: An ethnobotanical study. J Ethnopharmacology, 124: 513-521.
[20]
Giday M, Asfaw Z, Woldu Z (2010). Ethnomedicinal study of plants used by Sheko ethnic group of Ethiopia. J Ethnopharmacol, 132 (1): 75–85.
[21]
Giday M, Teklehaymanot T, Animut A, Mekonnen Y (2007). Medicinal plants of the Shinasha, Agew-Awi and Amhara peoples in northwest Ethiopia. J Ethnopharmacol, 110:516–525.
[22]
Gidey, M., Asfaw, Z. Woldu&TeklehaymanotT(2009). Medicinal plant knowledge of the Bench ethnic group of Ethiopia: Ethnobotanical investigation. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine5: 34.
[23]
Hailemariam T., Demissew S., Asfaw Z. (2009). An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants used by local people in the lowlands of Konta Special Woreda, southern nations, nationalities and peoples regional state, Ethiopia. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 5: -5-26.
[24]
Heinrich, M., Ankli, A., Frei, B., Weimann, C. and Sticher, O. (1998). Medicinal plants in Mexico: Healer’s Consensus and Cultural Importance. Social Science and Medicine, 47: 1863-1875.
[25]
Hunde D, Asfaw Z, Kelbessa E (2004). Use and management of ethnoveterinary medicinal plants by indigenous people in ‘Boosat’ Welenchiti area. Ethiop J BiolSci, 3 (2): 113–132.
[26]
Hunde, D., ZemedeAsfaw&EnsermuKelbessa (2006). Use of traditional medicinal plants by people of ‘Boosat’ sub district, Central Eastern Ethiopia. Ethiopian Journal of Health Science 16 (2): 141-155.
[27]
Kent M, Cocker P. (1992). Vegetation description and analysis: A practical approach. London: CRC press, Boca Raton Ann Arbor and Belhaven press, p. 268.
[28]
Lulekal E, Asfaw Z, Kelbessa E, Van Damme P (2013). Ethnomedicinal study of plants used for human ailments in Ankober District, North Shewa Zone, Amhara region, Ethiopia. J EthnobiolEthnomed, 9: 63.
[29]
Lulekal E, Kelbessa E, Bekele T, Yineger H (2008). An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants in ManaAngetu District, southwestern Ethiopia. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 4: 10.
[30]
Martin, G. J. (1995). Ethnobotany: A method Manual. Chapman and Hall, London. Pp. 265-270.
[31]
Maroyi A. (2013) Traditional use of medicinal plants in South Central Zimbabwe: review & perspectives. J EthnobiolEthnomed. 9: 31.
[32]
Maryo M, Nemomissa N, Bekele T. (2015). An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants of the Kembatta ethnic group in Enset-based agricultural landscape of KembattaTembaro (KT) Zone, Southern Ethiopia. Asian Journal of Plant Science and Research, 5 (7): 42-61.
[33]
Megersa M, Asfaw Z, Kelbessa E. Beyene A, Woldeab B (2013). An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants in WayuTuka District, East Welega Zone of Oromia Regional State, West Ethiopia, J EthnobiolEthnomed, 9: 68.
[34]
Mekuanent T, Zebene Aand Solomon Z (2015). Ethnobotanical Study of Medicinal Plants in Chilga District, Northwestern Ethiopia, Journal of natural remedies. Journal of Natural Remedies: 15 (2) 2320-3358.
[35]
Mesfin F, (2007). An Ethnobotanical Study of medicinal Plants in WonagoWereda, SNNPR, Ethiopia. M. Sc. Thesis. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
[36]
Mesfin F, Demissew S, Teklehaymanot T (2009). An Ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants in WenagoWoreda, SNNPR, Ethiopia. JEthnobiolEthnomed, 5: 28.
[37]
Mohammed A (2004). Traditional Use, Management and Conservation of Useful Plants in Dry Land Parts of North Shewa Zone of the Amhara National Region, M. Sc. thesis. Ethiopia: Addis Ababa University.
[38]
Mohammed A, Kidanu A, Mohamed A, Asrat P, Abera K, Shemles, Befikadu Y, Zewdu M, Tesfaye A, Yohans, Birhanu G, Jemal M (2011). Dire Dawa Administration Program of Adaptation to Climate Change. DDAEPA. Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.
[39]
Murad W., Azizullah A, Adnan M., Tariq A., Khan U., Waheed S., Ahmad A (2013). Ethnobotanical assessment of plant resources of Banda Daud Shah, District Karak, Pakistan. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 9: 77.
[40]
Pieroni A (2001). Evaluation of the cultural significance of wild food botanicals traditionally consumed in north-western Tuscany, Italy. J Ethnobiol 2001, 21: 89–104.
[41]
Parvez andYadav (2010) Ethnopharmacology of single herbal preparations of medicinal plants in Asendabo district, Jimma, Ethiopia. Indian J TraditKnowl, 9 (4): 724–729.
[42]
Regassa R (2013). Assessment of indigenous knowledge of medicinal plant practice and mode of service delivery in Hawassa city, southern Ethiopia. Journal of Medicinal Plant Research, 7 (9): 517-535.
[43]
Seifu T, Asres K, Gebre-Mariam T (2006). Ethnobotanical and ethnopharmaceutical studies on medicinal plants of Chifra District, Afar Region, Northeastern Ethiopia. Ethiopian Pharmaceutical Journal, 24: 41-58.
[44]
Tamiru F., Terfa W., Kebede E., Dabessa G., Kumar Roy R. and Sorsa M. (2013). Ethno knowledge of plants used in Dabo Hana District, West Ethiopia. Journal of Medicinal Plant Research, 7(40): 2960-2971.
[45]
Teklehaymanot T, Gidey M (2007). Ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants used by people in Zegie Peninsula, Northwestern Ethiopia. J EthnobiologyEthnomedicine, 3: 12.
[46]
Tugume P, Kakudidi E. Buyinza M., Namaalwa J., Kamatenesi M., Mucunguzi P., and Kalema J (2016). Ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plant species used by communities around Mabira Central Forest Reserve, Uganda. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 12: 5.
[47]
Ugulu I, Baslar S, Yorek N, Dogan Y (2009). The investigation and quantitative ethnobotanical evaluation of medicinalplants used around Izmir province, Turkey, J Med Plant Res., 3 (5): 345-367.
[48]
Yigezu Y., Haile D., Yenet W. (2014). Ethnoveterinary medicines in four districts of Jimma zone, Ethiopia: cross sectional survey for plant species and mode of use. BMC Veterinary Research, 10: 76.
[49]
Yineger H, Kelbessa E, Bekele T, Lulekal E (2008). Plants used in traditional management of Human ailments at Bale Mountain National Park, South eastern Ethiopia, Journal of Medicinal Plant Research, 2 (6): 132-153.
[50]
Yineger H, Yewhalaw D and Teketay D (2008). Ethnomedicinal plant knowledge and practice of the Oromo ethnic group in south western Ethiopia. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 4: 11.
[51]
Yirga G. (2012a). Ethnobotanical Study of Medicinal Plants in and Around Alamata, Southern Tigray, Northern Ethiopia. Current Research. Journal of Biological Sciences, 2 (5): 338-344.
[52]
Yirga G., Teferi M., Gidey G., Zerabruk S. (2012b). An Ethnoveterinary survey of medicinal plants used to treat livestock diseases in Seharti-Samre district, Northern Ethiopia. African Journal of Plant Science, 6 (3): 113-119.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186