Antidiabetic and Thrombolytic Effects of Ethanolic Extract of Spilanthes paniculata Leaves
Journal of Plant Sciences
Volume 2, Issue 6-1, December 2014, Pages: 13-18
Received: Dec. 21, 2014; Accepted: Dec. 27, 2014; Published: Mar. 14, 2015
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Authors
Shamima Akter, Department of Pharmacy, Southeast University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Md. Ataur Rahman, Department of Pharmacy, Southeast University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Md. Abul Kalam Azad, Department of Pharmacy, Southeast University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Md. Mohiuddin, Department of Pharmacy, Southeast University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Abdullah Al Mamun, Department of Pharmacy, Southeast University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Jyotirmoy Sarker, Department of Pharmacy, Southeast University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Mohammad Safiqul Islam, Department of Pharmacy, Noakhali Science and Technology University, Noakhali, Bangladesh
Md. Shahid Sarwar, Department of Pharmacy, Southeast University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
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Abstract
Experimental studies explored the antidiabetic and thrombolytic effect of several Spilanthes species in various animal models, but previously no study was conducted to establish the antidiabetic and thrombolytic potentiality of Spilanthes paniculata. The present study investigate the antidiabetic and thrombolytic effects of ethanolic extract of Spilanthes paniculata leaves with the intention to find the drug for diabetes and thrombosis management from natural sources. The hypoglycemic effect of the extracts was tested in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic mice. Blood glucose level was measured according to glucose oxidase method. The thrombolytic activity was assessed by using human erythrocyte and the results were compared with standard streptokinase (SK). In the present research, the ethanolic extract of Spilanthes paniculata reduces the blood glucose level at a dose and time dependant manner. It was observed that the plant possess significant antidiabetic activity (P<0.05) at higher dose (450 mg/kg body weight) when compared with standard drug glibenclamide. The extract, at a dose of 150, 300 and 450 mg/kg body weight showed glucose reduction from 23.37±1.80, 20.1±2.60 and 17.13±1.36 initial levels to 11.07±1.98, 10.1±0.26 and 8.3±0.15 mmol/L after 8 hours respectively. In this study, the ethanolic extract of Spilanthes paniculata showed moderate clot lysis activity. The clot lysis activity of control, standard (streptokinase) and ethanolic extract of Spilanthes paniculata was 2.65%, 93.35% and 46.78% respectively. This study explored that ethanolic extract of Spilanthes paniculata leaves has potential antidiabetic and moderate thrombolytic activity.
Keywords
Spilanthes paniculata, Antidiabetic, Alloxan, Sptreptokinase, Thrombolytic
To cite this article
Shamima Akter, Md. Ataur Rahman, Md. Abul Kalam Azad, Md. Mohiuddin, Abdullah Al Mamun, Jyotirmoy Sarker, Mohammad Safiqul Islam, Md. Shahid Sarwar, Antidiabetic and Thrombolytic Effects of Ethanolic Extract of Spilanthes paniculata Leaves, Journal of Plant Sciences. Special Issue: Pharmacological and Biological Investigation of Medicinal Plants. Vol. 2, No. 6-1, 2014, pp. 13-18. doi: 10.11648/j.jps.s.2014020601.13
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