Comparative Evaluation of Antidiabetic Activity of Crude Methanolic Extract of Leaves, Fruits, Roots and Aerial Parts of Coccinia grandis
Journal of Plant Sciences
Volume 2, Issue 6-1, December 2014, Pages: 19-23
Received: Dec. 21, 2014; Accepted: Dec. 27, 2014; Published: Mar. 14, 2015
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Authors
Md. Ataur Rahman, Department of Pharmacy, Southeast University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Jyotirmoy Sarker, Department of Pharmacy, Southeast University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Shamima Akter, Department of Pharmacy, Southeast University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Abdullah Al Mamun, Department of Pharmacy, Southeast University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Md. Abul Kalam Azad, Department of Pharmacy, Southeast University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Md. Mohiuddin, Department of Pharmacy, Southeast University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Seuly Akter, Department of Pharmacy, Southeast University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Md. Shahid Sarwar, Department of Pharmacy, Southeast University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
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Abstract
Many traditional medicines in use are obtained from medicinal plants, minerals and organic matter. During the past several years, there has been increasing interest among the uses of various medicinal plants from the traditional system of medicine for the treatment of different ailments. Coccinia grandis has been used in traditional medicine as a household remedy for various diseases. The whole plant of Coccinia grandis having pharmacological activities like analgesic, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiulcer, antidiabetic, antioxidant, hypoglycemic, hepatoprotective, antimalarial, antidyslipidemic, anticancer, antitussive, mutagenic. The present review gives botany, chemical constituents and pharmacological activities of coccinia grandis. This study was aimed to investigate the antidiabetic activities of methanolic extract of leaves, fruits, root and aerial part of Coccinia grandis in alloxan induced diabetic mice. Diabetes was confirmed after 25 days of single intraperitoneal injection of alloxan (150 mg/kg) in albino mice. Different groups of diabetic animals were treated with crude plant extract of 150 mg/kg , 300 mg/kg, 400 mg /kg respectively orally administered for a period of 8 hours. The blood sugar level was monitored after 2 hour, after 4 hour, after 6 hour and after 8 hour respectively. The antidiabetic effect of crude plant extract was compared with Glibenclamide (10 mg/kg) belongs to the group of oral hypoglycemic. Our study indicate that, the root, fruit, leaf and aerial part of plant extract (150 mg/kg) reduce the blood glucose level after 8th hour 7.87±0.35, 17.9±12.18, 19.5±7.04 and 23.7±7.23 respectively. The root, fruit, leaf and aerial part of plant extract (300 mg/kg) reduce the blood glucose level after 8th hour 18±12, 19.6±11.6, 20.1±1.55 and 15.3±1.28 respectively. The root, fruit, leaf and aerial part of plant extract (450 mg/kg) reduce the blood glucose level after 8th hour 16.2±1.08, 9.4±0.46, 14.3±1.31 and 10.4±1.56 respectively. Glibenclamide (10 mg/kg) reduces the blood glucose level 11.27±4.64. From this study, it was revealed that different part of Coccinia grandis plant extract has potential antidiabetic activity.
Keywords
Alloxan, Coccinia grandis, Diabetes Mellitus, Glibenclamide, Hypoglycemic Activity
To cite this article
Md. Ataur Rahman, Jyotirmoy Sarker, Shamima Akter, Abdullah Al Mamun, Md. Abul Kalam Azad, Md. Mohiuddin, Seuly Akter, Md. Shahid Sarwar, Comparative Evaluation of Antidiabetic Activity of Crude Methanolic Extract of Leaves, Fruits, Roots and Aerial Parts of Coccinia grandis, Journal of Plant Sciences. Special Issue: Pharmacological and Biological Investigation of Medicinal Plants. Vol. 2, No. 6-1, 2014, pp. 19-23. doi: 10.11648/j.jps.s.2014020601.14
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