Adaptability Study of Banana (Musa Paradisiacal var. Sapiertum) Varieties at Jinka, Southern Ethiopia
American Journal of Agriculture and Forestry
Volume 2, Issue 6, November 2014, Pages: 250-255
Received: Oct. 14, 2014; Accepted: Oct. 20, 2014; Published: Oct. 30, 2014
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Authors
Tekle Yoseph, Southern Agricultural Research Institute, Jinka Agricultural Research Center, Department of Crop Science Research Process, Jinka, Ethiopia
Wondewosen Shiferaw, Southern Agricultural Research Institute, Jinka Agricultural Research Center, Department of Crop Science Research Process, Jinka, Ethiopia
Zemach Sorsa, Department of Plant Sciences and Horticulture, Wolaita Sodo University, Wolaita Sodo, Ethiopia
Tibebu Simon, Department of Plant Sciences and Horticulture, Wolaita Sodo University, Wolaita Sodo, Ethiopia
Abraham Shumbullo, Department of Plant Sciences and Horticulture, Wolaita Sodo University, Wolaita Sodo, Ethiopia
Woineshet Solomon, Southern Agricultural Research Institute, Hawassa Agricultural Research Center, Department of Crop Science Research Process, Hawassa, Ethiopia
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Abstract
A field experiment involving eleven improved banana (Musa paradisiacal var. sapiertum) varieties and one local check was carried out at Jinka Agricultural Research Center during the 2006 to 2009 cropping seasons under rain fed conditions to identify the best performing variety to the target areas of South Omo Zone. The banana varieties included in the field experiment were eleven improved (Kampala, Pisang, Lacatan, Poyo, Dwarf Cavendish, Giant Cavendish, Butuzua, Grand Naine, Robusta, Williams-1, Williams-2) and a local check. The experimental design was a randomized complete block design (RCBD) with three replications. Phenological and growth parameters, bunch yield and yield components were studied. The result showed that days to flowering were significantly affected by variety while days to maturity were not significantly influenced by variety. Psedostem height was significantly affected by variety; whereas, variety had brought no significant effect on psedostem circumference. All the yield and yield components studied were significantly affected by variety except finger diameter. Bunch yield advantages of 59.11%, 55.87% and 47.55%, were obtained from the improved banana varieties Dwarf Cavandish, Giant Cavandish and Poyo, respectively over the local check. The highest bunch yields of (45.333 t ha-1) and (42.000 t ha-1) were recorded for the varieties Dwarf Cavendish and Giant Cavendish, respectively. Therefore, it can be concluded that use of the improved banana varieties such as Dwarf Cavendish or Giant Cavendish is advisable and could be appropriate for banana production in the test area even though further testing is required to put the recommendation on a strong basis.
Keywords
Banana Variety, Bunch Yield, Growth Parameters, Phenological Parameters, Yield Components
To cite this article
Tekle Yoseph, Wondewosen Shiferaw, Zemach Sorsa, Tibebu Simon, Abraham Shumbullo, Woineshet Solomon, Adaptability Study of Banana (Musa Paradisiacal var. Sapiertum) Varieties at Jinka, Southern Ethiopia, American Journal of Agriculture and Forestry. Vol. 2, No. 6, 2014, pp. 250-255. doi: 10.11648/j.ajaf.20140206.13
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