Influence of NPK 15-15-15 Fertilizer and Pig Manure on Nutrient Dynamics and Production of Cowpea, Vigna Unguiculata L. Walp
American Journal of Agriculture and Forestry
Volume 2, Issue 6, November 2014, Pages: 267-273
Received: Nov. 8, 2014; Accepted: Nov. 17, 2014; Published: Nov. 20, 2014
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Author
Omotoso Solomon Olusegun, Department of Crop, Soil and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria
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Abstract
A constant challenge for farmers in Nigeria is how to increase crop production in the face of low inherent nutrient status and rapid soil fertility depletion. This has attracted studies on how to build up nutrient capital in soil. Influence of NPK 15-15-15 fertilizer and pig manure on nutrient dynamics and production of cowpea vigna unguiculata L. Walp were evaluated at the Teaching and Research Farm, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria in experiments consisting of six treatments laid out in a randomized complete block design with three replicates. The treatments consisted of 60kg NPK 15-15-15, 4t/ha Pig manure (PM), 8t/ha Pig manure, 4t/ha PM+60kg NPK 15-15-15, 8t/ha PM+60kg NPK 15-15-15 and no fertilizer as control. Data on plant height, no of branches, no of leaves, no of nodules/plant, dry matter yield taken at 50% flowering, number of pods/plant, number of seeds/pod, 100 seed weight and seed yield were collected. The result showed that 8t/haPM+60kgNPK gave significantly (p<0.05) higher number of nodules.plant-1(13.7), dry matter (40.3g.plant-1), number of pods.plant-1 (23.7), number of seeds.pod-1 (12.3) and 100 seed weight (25.5g) respectively. Maximum seed yield of 1.40t/ha was obtained with application of 8t/haPM + 60kgNPK. Sole application of pig manure and its combination with NPK significantly increased soil N, P, K, Ca and Mg. It can be concluded that for maximum production, the amount of pig manure required can reduce the chemical fertilizer that would be needed for cowpea.
Keywords
Cowpea, Yield Attributes, Nutrient Dynamics, NPK Fertilizer, Organic Manure
To cite this article
Omotoso Solomon Olusegun, Influence of NPK 15-15-15 Fertilizer and Pig Manure on Nutrient Dynamics and Production of Cowpea, Vigna Unguiculata L. Walp, American Journal of Agriculture and Forestry. Vol. 2, No. 6, 2014, pp. 267-273. doi: 10.11648/j.ajaf.20140206.16
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