Traditional Rice Farming Ritual Practices of the Magindanawn in Southern Philippines
American Journal of Agriculture and Forestry
Volume 3, Issue 6-1, December 2015, Pages: 15-18
Received: Mar. 28, 2015; Accepted: Sep. 16, 2015; Published: Nov. 10, 2015
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Authors
Saavedra M. Mantikayan, College of Agriculture, Cotabato Foundation College of Science and Technology, Doroluman, Arakan, Cotabato Philippines
Esmael L. Abas, College of Agriculture, Cotabato Foundation College of Science and Technology, Doroluman, Arakan, Cotabato Philippines
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Abstract
The study is purely a documentation of the traditional rice farming rituals and practices of the Magindanawn in Southern Philippines. Specifically aims: to identify the farming rituals of the Magindanawn farmers; to descriptively analyzed the rationale behind the practice of rituals in farming; and to determine the factors that made rituals persistence amidst the prevalence of the modern Agriculture. The researchers found that farming rituals are based on Magindanawn beliefs as acts or ways of communicating the soul of uyag-uyag (life sustenance) which is the elder brother of the spirit (soul) of human being as narrated by Tawalang Kalting. The rationale behind farming rituals retention among Magindanawn were based on their highest one belief that “ALLAH” is the most extremely super power. In such the Traditional Magindanawn found out the following belief: a.) Belief in the competence of ALLAH; b.) Palay (Rice), as one of the bounties given by ALLAH, followed the order of nature. c.) According to the Islamic point of view, Angel Michael is one of the Angels of ALLAH who was instructed as in-charge of bounties all over the World; d.) Human beings are enjoined to follow instruction from ALLAH. Farming rituals among Magindanawn farmers are desired for prosperous production. The rituals before rice planting, like calling the name of stars such as balatik, malala, mabu and others, and calling the names of prominent people and different name of angels are not in conformity with Islamic teaching.
Keywords
Traditional Rice Farming, Farming Ritual Practices, Magindanawn, Southern Philippines
To cite this article
Saavedra M. Mantikayan, Esmael L. Abas, Traditional Rice Farming Ritual Practices of the Magindanawn in Southern Philippines, American Journal of Agriculture and Forestry. Special Issue: Agro-Ecosystems. Vol. 3, No. 6-1, 2015, pp. 15-18. doi: 10.11648/j.ajaf.s.2015030601.14
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