Effect of the Base of the Shoe Heel on Postural Stability During Walking in Women
American Journal of BioScience
Volume 3, Issue 5, September 2015, Pages: 167-170
Received: Mar. 23, 2015; Accepted: Apr. 9, 2015; Published: Jul. 21, 2015
Views 3562      Downloads 71
Authors
Falola Jean-Marie, Laboratory of Biomechanics and Performance (LABIOP), National Institute of Youth, Physical Education and Sport (INJEPS) University of Abomey Calavi (UAC), Porto-Novo, Benin; Laboratory Human Motricity, Education, Sport, Health (LAMHESS) Training Unit and Research in Sciences and Techniques of Physical and Sports Activities (STAPS) University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice, France
Koussihouèdé Fifamè Eudia Nadège, Laboratory of Biomechanics and Performance (LABIOP), National Institute of Youth, Physical Education and Sport (INJEPS) University of Abomey Calavi (UAC), Porto-Novo, Benin
Falola Stève Marjelin Donan, Laboratory of Biomechanics and Performance (LABIOP), National Institute of Youth, Physical Education and Sport (INJEPS) University of Abomey Calavi (UAC), Porto-Novo, Benin
Avossevou Yves Gabriel, Research Unit Theoretical Physics (URPT) Institute of Mathematics and Physical Sciences (IMSP) University of Abomey Calavi (UAC), Porto-Novo, Benin
Bio Nigan Issiako, Laboratory APS and Motricity (LABAPSM), National Institute of Youth, Physical Education and Sport (INJEPS) University of Abomey-Calavi (UAC), Porto-Novo, Benin
Dansou Houndjovi Pierre, Laboratory of Exercise Physiology (LPE), National Institute of Youth, Physical Education and Sport (INJEPS) University of Abomey-Calavi (UAC), Porto-Novo, Benin
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
The high-heeled shoes are the cause of slips and falls while walking. Objective: To determine the shape of the base of the heel of the shoe to a stabilization of the locomotor pattern of walking. Materials and Methods: Fifteen young women had normal-weighted market shoes without heel and with heels of 5.08 cm; 7.6 cm and 10 cm. Each shoe were associated three square bases whose sides were: small: 1.5 cm; average: 3 cm wide and 5.3 cm. Results: Significant differences between the kinematic parameters were only for small and medium bases. There was no significant difference between the large base and the heel without shoes. The base of the heel of the shoe that stabilizes the locomotor pattern of walking is one that is large and whose side is equal to 5.3 cm. This value represents the heel of the foot width of the subject.
Keywords
Gait, Kinematic Parameters, High Heels, Base of the Heel
To cite this article
Falola Jean-Marie, Koussihouèdé Fifamè Eudia Nadège, Falola Stève Marjelin Donan, Avossevou Yves Gabriel, Bio Nigan Issiako, Dansou Houndjovi Pierre, Effect of the Base of the Shoe Heel on Postural Stability During Walking in Women, American Journal of BioScience. Vol. 3, No. 5, 2015, pp. 167-170. doi: 10.11648/j.ajbio.20150305.11
References
[1]
Bouisset S, Maton B. Muscles, postures et mouvements: base et applications de la méthode électromyographique. Paris: Hermann; 2000.
[2]
Braune W, Fischer O. On the centre of gravity of the human body. Berlin: Springer Verlag; 1985.
[3]
Chien HL, Liu MW, Lu TW, Kuo CC, Chung PC. Inter-joint sharing of total support moments in the lower extremities during gait in narrow-heeled shoes of different heights. J Biomech. 2013; 46(12): 2067-74.
[4]
Ebbeling CJ, Hamill J, Crussemeyer JA. Lower extremity mechanics and energy cost of walking in high-heeled shoes. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 1994;19(4):190-6.
[5]
Hong Y, Wang SJ, Lam WK, Cheung JT. Kinetics of Badminton Lunges in Four Directions. J Biomech. 2013; 46(12): 2067-74.
[6]
Hong WH, Lee YH, Chen HC, Pei YC, Wu CY. Influence of heel height and shoe insert on comfort perception and biomechanical performance of young female adults during walking. Foot Ankle Int. 2005; 26(12):1042-8.
[7]
Lord SR, Bashford GM. Shoe characteristics and balance in older women. J Am Geriatr Soc. 1996;44:429-33
[8]
Menz HB, Lord SR. Footwear and postural stability in older people. J Am Podiatr Med Assoc. 1999;89: 346–357.
[9]
Perry J. Gait Analysis, Normal and Pathological Function. Thorofare New Jersey: Slack; 1992. 48p.
[10]
Phillips RD, Reczek DM, Fountain D, et al.. Modification of high-heeled shoes to decrease promotion during gait. J Am Podiatr Med Assoc. 1991 ; (81) : 215.
[11]
Pinhasi R, Gasparian B, Areshian G, Zardaryan D, Smith A. First Direct Evidence of Chatolitic Footwear from the Near Eastern Highlands. PLoS ONE. 2010; 5(6).
[12]
Plas F, Viel E, Blanc Y. La marche humaine. Kinésiologie dynamique, biomécanique et pathomécanique. 2èd. Paris: Masson; 1979.
[13]
Sekiya N, Nagasaki H, Ito H, Furuna T. Optimal walking in terms of variability in step length. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 1997;26(5):266-72.
[14]
Shefanyshyn DJ, Nigg BM, Fisher V, O’Flynn B, Liu W. The influence of high heeled hoes on kinematics, kinetics, and muscle EMG of normal female gait. J Appl Biomech. 2000; 16(3); 309-19.
[15]
Tortolero X, Masani K, Maluly C, et al. Body Movement induced by Electrical Stimulation of Toe Muscles During Standing. Artif Organs. 2007; 32(1): 5–12.
[16]
Vaughan CL, Davis BL, O’connor JC. Gait analysis laboratory. Champaign IL. Human kinetics Publishers. 1992;1-14.
[17]
Viel E. La marche humaine, la course et le saut: biomécanique, explorations, normes et dysfonctionnements. Le Point en rééducation et en APS, 9. Paris : Masson ; 2009. ;267 p
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186