Evaluation of Biochemical Marker - Glutathione and DNA Fingerprinting of Biofield Energy Treated Oryza sativa
American Journal of BioScience
Volume 3, Issue 6, November 2015, Pages: 243-248
Received: Oct. 12, 2015; Accepted: Oct. 21, 2015; Published: Nov. 14, 2015
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Authors
Mahendra Kumar Trivedi, Trivedi Global Inc., Henderson, USA
Alice Branton, Trivedi Global Inc., Henderson, USA
Dahryn Trivedi, Trivedi Global Inc., Henderson, USA
Gopal Nayak, Trivedi Global Inc., Henderson, USA
Sambhu Charan Mondal, Trivedi Science Research Laboratory Pvt. Ltd., Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
Snehasis Jana, Trivedi Science Research Laboratory Pvt. Ltd., Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
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Abstract
Food production needs to increase to satisfy the demand due to increasing human population worldwide. To minimize this food crisis, an increase in the rice production is necessary in many countries. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment on rice (Oryza sativa) for its growth-germination of seedling, glutathione (GSH) content in seedling and mature plants, indole acetic acid (IAA) content in shoots and roots and DNA polymorphism by random amplified polymorphic-DNA (RAPD). The sample of O. sativa cv, 644 was divided into two groups. One group was remained as untreated and coded as control, while the other group was subjected to Mr. Trivedi for biofield energy treatment and denoted as treated sample. The growth-germination of O. sativa seedling data exhibited that the biofield treated seeds was germinated faster on day 3 as compared to control (on day 5). The shoot and root length of seedling was slightly increased in the treated seeds of 10 days old with respect to untreated seeds. Moreover, the plant antioxidant i.e. GSH content in seedling and in mature plants was significantly increased by 639.26% and 56.24%, respectively as compared to untreated sample. Additionally, the plant growth regulatory constituent i.e. IAA level in root and shoot was significantly (p<0.05) increased by 106.90% and 20.35%, respectively with respect to control. Besides, the DNA fingerprinting data using RAPD, revealed that the treated sample showed an average range of 5 to 46% of DNA polymorphism as compared to control. The overall results envisaged that the biofield energy treatment on rice seeds showed a significant improvement in germination, growth of roots and shoots, GSH and IAA content in the treated sample. In conclusion, the treatment of biofield energy on rice seeds could be used as an alternative way to increase the production of rice.
Keywords
Rice, Biofield Energy Treatment, Oryza sativa, Seedling, RAPD, Glutathione, Indole Acetic Acid
To cite this article
Mahendra Kumar Trivedi, Alice Branton, Dahryn Trivedi, Gopal Nayak, Sambhu Charan Mondal, Snehasis Jana, Evaluation of Biochemical Marker - Glutathione and DNA Fingerprinting of Biofield Energy Treated Oryza sativa, American Journal of BioScience. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2015, pp. 243-248. doi: 10.11648/j.ajbio.20150306.16
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Copyright © 2015 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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