Noise in Olive Mills, the Case of Jordan: Actual Measurements & Reduction Proposition
International Journal of Mechanical Engineering and Applications
Volume 3, Issue 3, June 2015, Pages: 46-49
Received: May 30, 2015; Accepted: Jun. 18, 2015; Published: Jul. 4, 2015
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Authors
Rizeq N. Hammad, Department of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering, Jordan University, Amman, Jordan
May M. Hourani, Department of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering, Jordan University, Amman, Jordan
Firas M. Sharaf, Department of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering, Jordan University, Amman, Jordan
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Abstract
This study is concerned mainly with high noise produced by automated olive mills and its negative impact on human health. This study looks at what caused this problem such as the application of building codes concerning user exposure to noise and protective measures for workers. Long working period exposure to high noise, particularly mill workers, causes health and ear illness. Noise levels are measured in several olive mills in Jordan, recorded data was analyzed and findings indicated that noise level is higher than the maximum noise limits allowed by the Jordanian code. This study concludes design solutions and legislative procedures to improve noise control in olive mills.
Keywords
Olive Mills Design, High Noise Impact, Noise Reduction
To cite this article
Rizeq N. Hammad, May M. Hourani, Firas M. Sharaf, Noise in Olive Mills, the Case of Jordan: Actual Measurements & Reduction Proposition, International Journal of Mechanical Engineering and Applications. Vol. 3, No. 3, 2015, pp. 46-49. doi: 10.11648/j.ijmea.20150303.13
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