Analysis and Design of a Scramjet Engine Inlet Operating from Mach 5 to Mach 10
International Journal of Mechanical Engineering and Applications
Volume 4, Issue 1, February 2016, Pages: 11-23
Received: Jan. 14, 2016; Accepted: Jan. 25, 2016; Published: Feb. 16, 2016
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Authors
Luu Hong Quan, Department of Aeronautical and Space Engineering, School of Transportation Engineering, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam
Nguyen Phu Hung, The Ministry of Science and Technology – Hanoi University of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam
Le Doan Quang, Faculty of Aviation Technologies, Vietnam Aviation Academy, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Vu Ngoc Long, Department of Aeronautical and Space Engineering, School of Transportation Engineering, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam
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Abstract
This paper gives a preliminary report of the analysis and design process of a scramjet engine inlet operating over a Mach number range from 5 to 10 without the use of variable geometry (moving parts) in order to find an optimal 2D geometry. An introduction of scramjet engine as well as its first component, the inlet, is given in the beginning and a number of basic inlet configurations are proposed. Inlet efficiency parameters and various design criteria are then explained, followed by a theoretical flow analysis utilizing some simplifying assumptions and the oblique shockwave relations. Next, 2D CFD simulations are carried out for some inlet geometries that are constructed based on the results of the theoretical analysis using the K-Omega SST turbulence model in Fluent to take into consideration boundary layer phenomena that the theoretical analysis is not able to cover. Lastly, a conclusion summarizing the design process is drawn and the optimal model is recommended.
Keywords
Scramjet, Hypersonic, Inlet, Oblique Shockwave, CFD
To cite this article
Luu Hong Quan, Nguyen Phu Hung, Le Doan Quang, Vu Ngoc Long, Analysis and Design of a Scramjet Engine Inlet Operating from Mach 5 to Mach 10, International Journal of Mechanical Engineering and Applications. Vol. 4, No. 1, 2016, pp. 11-23. doi: 10.11648/j.ijmea.20160401.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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