Analysis of a Dual-Mode Scramjet Engine Isolator Operating From Mach 3.5 to Mach 6
International Journal of Mechanical Engineering and Applications
Volume 4, Issue 5, October 2016, Pages: 189-198
Received: Aug. 28, 2016; Accepted: Sep. 10, 2016; Published: Sep. 29, 2016
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Authors
Vu Ngoc Long, Department of Aeronautical and Space Engineering, School of Transportation Engineering, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam
Luu Hong Quan, Department of Aeronautical and Space Engineering, School of Transportation Engineering, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam
Nguyen Phu Hung, The Ministry of Science and Technology, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam
Le Doan Quang, Faculty of Aviation Technologies, Vietnam Aviation Academy, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
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Abstract
Isolator is an important component of the hypersonic dual-mode scramjet engine, which plays a critical role on the stability of the engine. Flow structure inside an isolator is quite complicated due to separation zones and shock train. The main function of an isolator is to prevent the separated flow from deviating outside the engine, causing it to stop working. This paper will present a mathematical model of the flow through an isolator, then carry out theoretical flow calculation and CFD simulation in order to determine the length and the operational mode of the isolator of a dual-mode scramjet engine operating from Mach 3.5 to Mach 6. The theoretical and CFD results will also be compared to verify the mathematical model.
Keywords
Dual-mode Scramjet, Isolator, Shock Train, CFD
To cite this article
Vu Ngoc Long, Luu Hong Quan, Nguyen Phu Hung, Le Doan Quang, Analysis of a Dual-Mode Scramjet Engine Isolator Operating From Mach 3.5 to Mach 6, International Journal of Mechanical Engineering and Applications. Vol. 4, No. 5, 2016, pp. 189-198. doi: 10.11648/j.ijmea.20160405.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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