Experimental Studies on Micropumps Using Rotational/Reciprocating Motions of Magnetic Material Balls
International Journal of Mechanical Engineering and Applications
Volume 5, Issue 5, October 2017, Pages: 247-252
Received: Jul. 10, 2017; Accepted: Jul. 21, 2017; Published: Sep. 18, 2017
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Authors
Hiroshige Kumamaru, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Himeji, Japan
Yoshio Nomura, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Himeji, Japan
Fuma Sakata, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Himeji, Japan
Hayata Fujiwara, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Himeji, Japan
Kazuhiro Itoh, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Himeji, Japan
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Abstract
In application of micropumps to new fields in chemistry, biology, medical science and others, smaller sizes are supposed to be important rather than higher pump performance. In this study, considering from such a view point, micropumps using rotational and reciprocating motions of magnetic material balls were proposed and studied experimentally. The pump performance, i.e. the relation between flow rate and pump head are measured from liquid level changes in two containers connected to the inlet and outlet of the micropump. For the rotational motion micropump, while the maximum flow rate obtained, ~2 mL/min, is large enough as a micropump, the maximum pump head achieved, ~15 mm, is small even for a micropump. It is desirable to increase the pump head furthermore for this micropump. For the reciprocating motion micropump, the maximum flow rate obtained and the maximum pump head achieved are ~7.5 mL/min and ~625 mm, respectively. These values of the pump performance are sufficient as a micropump. Both the micropumps can be incorporated into microfluidic devices (tips) and can pump arbitrary kind of liquid.
Keywords
Micropump, Magnetic Material Ball, Rotational Motion, Reciprocating Motion, Pump Performance
To cite this article
Hiroshige Kumamaru, Yoshio Nomura, Fuma Sakata, Hayata Fujiwara, Kazuhiro Itoh, Experimental Studies on Micropumps Using Rotational/Reciprocating Motions of Magnetic Material Balls, International Journal of Mechanical Engineering and Applications. Vol. 5, No. 5, 2017, pp. 247-252. doi: 10.11648/j.ijmea.20170505.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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