Design, Manufacture and Performance Evaluation of a Soybean Paddle Thresher with a Blower
International Journal of Mechanical Engineering and Applications
Volume 5, Issue 5, October 2017, Pages: 253-258
Received: Jul. 15, 2017; Accepted: Jul. 21, 2017; Published: Sep. 25, 2017
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Authors
Philip Yamba, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tamale Technical University, Northern Region, Tamale, Ghana; School of Mechanical Engineering (SME), Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, People’s Republic of China
Enoch Asuako Larson, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tamale Technical University, Northern Region, Tamale, Ghana; School of Mechanical Engineering (SME), Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, People’s Republic of China
Zakaria Issaka, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tamale Technical University, Northern Region, Tamale, Ghana; School of Mechanical Engineering (SME), Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, People’s Republic of China
Anthony Akayeti, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tamale Technical University, Northern Region, Tamale, Ghana; School of Mechanical Engineering (SME), Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, People’s Republic of China
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Abstract
Soybeans threshing is traditionally done by hand beating with a wooden stick on a hard surface which is a drudgeries operation which leads to time-consuming, grain damage and grain loss due to shattering for small-scale farmers. Therefore, a soybeans manual thresher (Pedal operated) machine attached to a blower was designed, manufactured and its performance evaluated to help eradicate this problem by reducing labor, improve post-harvest, and increase income to small-scale farmers. The thresher consists of a hopper, drum, shaft on bearings, frame, beaters, blower, chain, and sprocket power transmission, pedal and seat. The thresher was fabricated with sheets and angle iron and the mechanism is based on a combination of impact, compression, and shear. Two levels of moisture content level were combined to evaluate the performance of thresher in terms of its capacity, threshing efficiency and percentage grain damage. The combination of dried and wet sample mixture at a feed rate of 25kg yielded maximum threshing capacity of 96 kg/hr, 98.6% maximum threshing efficiency and minimum percent grain damage of 3.5% results was recorded, which was very satisfactory.
Keywords
Soybeans, Pedal Operated, Thresher, Blower
To cite this article
Philip Yamba, Enoch Asuako Larson, Zakaria Issaka, Anthony Akayeti, Design, Manufacture and Performance Evaluation of a Soybean Paddle Thresher with a Blower, International Journal of Mechanical Engineering and Applications. Vol. 5, No. 5, 2017, pp. 253-258. doi: 10.11648/j.ijmea.20170505.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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