Prevalence of Intestinal Parasites Among Preschool Children and Maternal KAP on Prevention and Control in Senbete and Bete Towns, North Shoa, Ethiopia
International Journal of Biomedical Materials Research
Volume 7, Issue 1, June 2019, Pages: 1-7
Received: Jan. 10, 2019; Accepted: Feb. 11, 2019; Published: Feb. 27, 2019
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Authors
Moges Lewetegn, Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Debre Berhan University, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia
Meron Getachew, Bloomberg Philanthropies Initiative for Global Road Safety Surveillance Coordinator, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Tadesse Kebede, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Parasitology, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Gemechu Tadesse, Department of Parasitology, Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Tsegahun Asfaw, Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Debre Berhan University, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia
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Abstract
In developing countries, intestinal parasites like protozoa and helminths are highly prevalent in preschool children. There is also poor understanding of the mother’s knowledge, attitude, and practices towards parasitic infections. Therefore, this study is designed to assess the prevalence of intestinal parasite and maternal knowledge, attitude and practice on the prevention and control of intestinal parasites. Cross-sectional study was conducted on preschool children in Senbete and Bete towns. Stool specimens were collected and examined for intestinal parasites by using Kato-Katz and formol-ether concentration technique. Mother’s knowledge, attitude, and practice data were collected using a per-tested structured questionnaire. Data was analysed using SPSS-20 and P values less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant value. Among 214 preschool children, the overall prevalence of intestinal parasite was 52.3%. The predominant parasites was Hymenolepis nana (23.8 %), followed by Giardia lamblia (19.6%). Among 214 interviewed mothers 129 (60.3%) had knowledge on prevention and control of intestinal parasites. And also 120(56.1%) of the respondent had positive attitude on the prevention and control of intestinal parasites. Moreover, 95(44.4%) of the mothers used toilet or container to dispose their children’s faeces and 186(86.9%) mothers gave drug for their child. High prevalence of intestinal parasite was found. Maternal education level, open field defecation and playing with soil were significantly associated with intestinal parasitic infections. Therefore, health education program to improve maternal knowledge, attitude and practice should be implemented.
Keywords
Preschool Children, Intestinal Parasite, Maternal Knowledge, Attitude and Practice
To cite this article
Moges Lewetegn, Meron Getachew, Tadesse Kebede, Gemechu Tadesse, Tsegahun Asfaw, Prevalence of Intestinal Parasites Among Preschool Children and Maternal KAP on Prevention and Control in Senbete and Bete Towns, North Shoa, Ethiopia, International Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Vol. 7, No. 1, 2019, pp. 1-7. doi: 10.11648/j.ijbmr.20190701.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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