Facilitated Transport of Lysine Acetylsalicylate Through Supported Liquid Membrane Using Methyl Cholate as Carrier: Parameters and Mechanism
American Journal of Chemical Engineering
Volume 5, Issue 4, July 2017, Pages: 49-55
Received: Apr. 15, 2017; Accepted: May 5, 2017; Published: Jun. 21, 2017
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Authors
Oussama Kamal, Laboratory of Materials Engineering for the Environment and Valuation, Faculty of Sciences Aïn Chock, University Hassan II, Casablanca, Morocco; Laboratory of Polymeres Biopolymeres Surfaces, Faculty des Sciences, University of Rouen, Mont-Saint-Aignan, France
Tarik Eljaddi, Laboratory of Materials Engineering for the Environment and Valuation, Faculty of Sciences Aïn Chock, University Hassan II, Casablanca, Morocco
Habib Mouadili, Laboratory of Materials Engineering for the Environment and Valuation, Faculty of Sciences Aïn Chock, University Hassan II, Casablanca, Morocco
El Houssaine EL Atmani, Laboratory of Materials Engineering for the Environment and Valuation, Faculty of Sciences Aïn Chock, University Hassan II, Casablanca, Morocco
Laurent Lebrun, Laboratory of Polymeres Biopolymeres Surfaces, Faculty des Sciences, University of Rouen, Mont-Saint-Aignan, France
Miloudi Hlaïbi, Laboratory of Materials Engineering for the Environment and Valuation, Faculty of Sciences Aïn Chock, University Hassan II, Casablanca, Morocco; Laboratory of Polymeres Biopolymeres Surfaces, Faculty des Sciences, University of Rouen, Mont-Saint-Aignan, France
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Abstract
Transport of lysine acetylsalicylate (LAS) through supported liquid membrane was investigated using methyl cholate (MC) as extractive agent. Kinetic and thermodynamic models were developed, based on the interaction of the substrate LAS with the extractive agent T, and the diffusion of the formed entity (TS) through the membrane. The experimental results verify the models and enable the determination of macroscopic parameters (permeabilities (P) and initial fluxes (J0)), as well as microscopic parameters (association constants (Kass), and apparent diffusion coefficients (D*)), relating to formed entity (TS) and its diffusion through the membrane organic phase. Parameters such as initial concentration of the substrate in the feed phase, pH of the feed and stripping phases and temperature of the extraction medium were studied. The results obtain indicate that the mechanism of the migration of LAS through the membrane organic phase cannot be a pure diffusion movement but it takes place by successive jumps from one site to another of the extractive agent, via interaction reactions with LAS.
Keywords
Facilitated Transport, Supported Liquid Membranes, Permeability, Flux, Activation Parameters
To cite this article
Oussama Kamal, Tarik Eljaddi, Habib Mouadili, El Houssaine EL Atmani, Laurent Lebrun, Miloudi Hlaïbi, Facilitated Transport of Lysine Acetylsalicylate Through Supported Liquid Membrane Using Methyl Cholate as Carrier: Parameters and Mechanism, American Journal of Chemical Engineering. Vol. 5, No. 4, 2017, pp. 49-55. doi: 10.11648/j.ajche.20170504.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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