Investigation on Phase Stability and Electrical Properties Bi2V1–xBixO5.5–x/2 (BIBIVOX) Solid Electrolyte for Intermediate Temperature – Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (IT–SOFCs)
American Journal of Chemical Engineering
Volume 5, Issue 6, November 2017, Pages: 169-176
Received: Apr. 14, 2017; Accepted: May 5, 2017; Published: Dec. 20, 2017
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Authors
Elyas Sadeq Alaghbari, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Applied Science, Taiz University, Taiz, Republic of Yemen
Sameh Abdulgalil Shaher Alariqi, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Applied Science, Taiz University, Taiz, Republic of Yemen
Niyazi Abdulmawla Sallam Al–Areqi, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Applied Science, Taiz University, Taiz, Republic of Yemen
Saba Beg, Solid–State Chemistry Lab, Physical Chemistry Division, Department of Chemistry, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India
Faria Khan Naqvi, Solid–State Chemistry Lab, Physical Chemistry Division, Department of Chemistry, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India
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Abstract
The solid– state fuel cell is the most widely adopted energy– generating technology in the world for which different oxide– ion conductors of pervoskite structures have been recently investigated for the application in the intermediate temperature– solid oxide fuel cells (IT–SOFCs). In the present work, samples of single substituted BIMEVOX i.e., BIBIVOX (Bi2V1–xBixO5.5–x/2) were prepared in the composition range 0 ≥ x ≥ 0.20 using bottom up sol–gel method. XRPD, FT–IR, DTA, SEM, EDS, and AC impedance spectroscopy were used for the investigation of the correlation between the structural phase stability and oxide– ion performance of the BIBIVOX materials. It has been found that orthorhombic, β, and incommensurate tetragonal, γ′–phases were stabilized at room temperature for compositions with x=0.15 and x=0.20, respectively. The enthalpy of β–γ and γ′–γ transition exhibited a general drop with increasing Bi content. The higher value of conductivity of the substituted compound as compared to the parent compound can be attributed to the increased oxygen vacancies generated as a result of cation doping. AC impedance spectroscopy reveals the fact that this ionic conductivity is mainly due to the grain contribution.
Keywords
BIBIVOX, Phase Transitions, Ac Impedance, Ionic Conductivity
To cite this article
Elyas Sadeq Alaghbari, Sameh Abdulgalil Shaher Alariqi, Niyazi Abdulmawla Sallam Al–Areqi, Saba Beg, Faria Khan Naqvi, Investigation on Phase Stability and Electrical Properties Bi2V1–xBixO5.5–x/2 (BIBIVOX) Solid Electrolyte for Intermediate Temperature – Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (IT–SOFCs), American Journal of Chemical Engineering. Vol. 5, No. 6, 2017, pp. 169-176. doi: 10.11648/j.ajche.20170506.19
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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