Structural Analysis and Growth Mechanism of Zn/ZnO Nanowires in AAO Template by Electrodeposition
American Journal of Chemical Engineering
Volume 7, Issue 1, January 2019, Pages: 51-56
Received: May 13, 2019; Published: Jun. 15, 2019
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Authors
Tahir Mehmood, The State Key Laboratory of Refractories and Metallurgy, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, International Research Institute for Steel Technology, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, P. R. China
Kaiming Wu, The State Key Laboratory of Refractories and Metallurgy, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, International Research Institute for Steel Technology, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, P. R. China
Aiman Mukhtar, The State Key Laboratory of Refractories and Metallurgy, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, International Research Institute for Steel Technology, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, P. R. China
Adnan Saeed, Department of Physics, Govt. College Women University, Sialkot, Punjab, Pakistan
Sadaf Jamil Rana, Department of Physics, Govt. College Women University, Sialkot, Punjab, Pakistan
Marina Afzal, Department of Physics, Govt. College Women University, Sialkot, Punjab, Pakistan
Muhammad Furqan Rauf, The State Key Laboratory of Refractories and Metallurgy, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, International Research Institute for Steel Technology, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, P. R. China
Babar Shahzad, Department of Physics, Govt. College Women University, Sialkot, Punjab, Pakistan
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Abstract
To fully understand the mechanism of forming Zn and ZnO nanowires in electrodeposition, Anodic Alumina Oxide (AAO) membrane was used to electrodeposit Zn/ZnO nanowires by varying the potential. The structure of electrodeposited Zn/ZnO nanowires is studied by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Different deposition parameters were used to obtain different structure of electrodeposited nanowires. At -1.4 V with pH2.5, the pure Zn nanowires are electrodeposited. By lowering the potential to -1.0 V with same electrolytic concentration and pH, the formed nanowires are mixture of Zn and ZnO. Further decrease in potential to -0.6V, electrodeposited nanowires are of pure ZnO. The size of the critical cluster decreases with increasing the over potential. The formation of pure ZnO nanowires can be attributed to the formation of large size critical Zn nuclei, the larger size of nuclei favors the formation of pure zinc oxides nanowires.
Keywords
Nanowires, AAO, Zn, ZnO, Nuclei
To cite this article
Tahir Mehmood, Kaiming Wu, Aiman Mukhtar, Adnan Saeed, Sadaf Jamil Rana, Marina Afzal, Muhammad Furqan Rauf, Babar Shahzad, Structural Analysis and Growth Mechanism of Zn/ZnO Nanowires in AAO Template by Electrodeposition, American Journal of Chemical Engineering. Vol. 7, No. 1, 2019, pp. 51-56. doi: 10.11648/j.ajche.20190701.16
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