Use of Fatty Acid Methyl Esters as Biocomponents for Diesel Fuels and for Preparation of Cetane Number Improvers
American Journal of Chemical Engineering
Volume 1, Issue 4, November 2013, Pages: 65-69
Received: Nov. 30, 2013; Published: Dec. 30, 2013
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Authors
Fahed Salem Khamis, Department of Oil and Gas Technology, College of Oil and Minerals, Aden University, Ataq-Yemen
Todor Vasilev Palichev, Department of industrial technology, Assen Zlatarov University, Burgas-Bulgaria
Galina Grigorova Khamis, Department of Oil and Gas Technology, College of Oil and Minerals, Aden University, Ataq-Yemen
Jabbar Lashkeri Ismail Agha, Department of Chemistry, College of science, Salahaddin University, Erbil-Iraq
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Abstract
Up to 15% of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) have been used as biocomponents for the manufacture of biodiesel fuels corresponding to the requirements of EN 590-09. Applying nitration with various agents has been obtained additives reducing the time delay of self-ignition (TDSI) of diesel fuels containing 20% light catalytic gas oil. The nitro products thus obtained increase also the resistance of the diesel fuel towards oxidation.
Keywords
Methyl Esters, Biodiesel, Nitration, Additives, Oxidation Stability
To cite this article
Fahed Salem Khamis, Todor Vasilev Palichev, Galina Grigorova Khamis, Jabbar Lashkeri Ismail Agha, Use of Fatty Acid Methyl Esters as Biocomponents for Diesel Fuels and for Preparation of Cetane Number Improvers, American Journal of Chemical Engineering. Vol. 1, No. 4, 2013, pp. 65-69. doi: 10.11648/j.ajche.20130104.11
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