The Effect of Aggressive Biological Materials on a Painted Automotive Body Surface Roughness
American Journal of Nano Research and Applications
Volume 3, Issue 2, March 2015, Pages: 17-26
Received: Feb. 27, 2015; Accepted: Mar. 9, 2015; Published: Mar. 14, 2015
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Authors
Mohammad Shukri Alsoufi, Mechanical Engineering Department, Collage of Engineering and Islamic Architecture, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia
Tahani Mohammad Bawazeer, Chemistry Department, Collage of Science, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia
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Abstract
There are different aggressive biological materials which may potentially deposit on a painted automotive body surface during its service life, causing possible local damage, loss of appearance and loss of protective aspects of the system. In this study, the effect of two types of aggressive biological materials on a painted automotive body surface, i.e., natural bird droppings and raw eggs were studied and subsequently explained in more detail. Furthermore, two different testing conditions approaches including in-door and out-door were utilized in order to investigate the surface roughness, Ra, and also to study the behavior of biologically degraded automotive body surface at nano-level scale. The effects of these biological materials on a painted automotive body surface and its appearance were investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and a stylus-based inductive gauge (Taly-surf®, from Taylor Hobson, Inc.), having electromagnetic control of the contact force. Engaged vertically on the top of the specimens, the force could be set much lower than the weight. Results showed that natural bird droppings and raw eggs have a dramatic effect on the appearance and surface roughness of a painted automotive surface body. It was also found that the degradation which occurred due to the natural bird droppings was more severe than that of the samples exposed to raw eggs.
Keywords
Biological, Automotive, Bird Droppings, Raw Eggs, Roughness
To cite this article
Mohammad Shukri Alsoufi, Tahani Mohammad Bawazeer, The Effect of Aggressive Biological Materials on a Painted Automotive Body Surface Roughness, American Journal of Nano Research and Applications. Vol. 3, No. 2, 2015, pp. 17-26. doi: 10.11648/j.nano.20150302.12
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