Fourth Order Virial Equation of State of a Nonadditive Lennard - Jones Fluid
International Journal of Computational and Theoretical Chemistry
Volume 3, Issue 4, July 2015, Pages: 28-33
Received: Sep. 5, 2015; Accepted: Sep. 21, 2015; Published: Oct. 10, 2015
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Authors
Kenneth Osondu Monago, Department of Pure and Industrial Chemistry, University of Port - Harcourt, Choba, Port - Harcourt, Nigeria
Charles Otobrise, Department of Chemistry, Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria
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Abstract
A fourth - order virial equation of state was combined with the Lennard – Jones potential and the Axilrod - Teller triple - dipole potential to determine the thermodynamic properties of argon in the gas phase. The fourth virial coefficient is exact at the level of graphs with at most three non - additive three - body potentials. The model parameters were determined in a fit to the speed - of - sound data. The equation of state predicted the second (volumetric and acoustic) and the fourth acoustic virial coefficients of argon, but failed to give quantitative predictions of the third (volumetric and acoustic) and the fourth volumetric virial coefficients. For the third and fourth volumetric virial coefficients in which the equation of state failed to provide quantitative predictions, it nevertheless provided qualitatively accurate information on the variation of thesefunctions with temperature.In the region of the critical point, the model can be used for exploratory calculations at densities up to about 0.9ρc.
Keywords
Lennard - Jones Potential, Volumetric Virial Coefficients of Argon, Acoustic Virial Coefficients of Argon, Fourth Virial Coefficients of Argon, Axilrod - Teller Triple - Dipole Potential
To cite this article
Kenneth Osondu Monago, Charles Otobrise, Fourth Order Virial Equation of State of a Nonadditive Lennard - Jones Fluid, International Journal of Computational and Theoretical Chemistry. Vol. 3, No. 4, 2015, pp. 28-33. doi: 10.11648/j.ijctc.20150304.11
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