A Note Study on Antidiabetic Effect of Main Molecules Contained in Clove Using Molecular Modeling Interactions with DPP-4 Enzyme
International Journal of Computational and Theoretical Chemistry
Volume 5, Issue 1, January 2017, Pages: 9-13
Received: Feb. 24, 2017; Accepted: Mar. 20, 2017; Published: Apr. 13, 2017
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Authors
Bouchentouf Salim, Faculty of Technology, Doctor Tahar Moulay University, Saida, Algeria; Laboratory of Naturals Products and Bioactives, Tlemcen, Algeria
Ghalem Said, Laboratory of Naturals Products and Bioactives, Tlemcen, Algeria; Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Aboubekr Belkaid University, Tlemcen, Algeria
Missoum Noureddine, Laboratory of Naturals Products and Bioactives, Tlemcen, Algeria; Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Aboubekr Belkaid University, Tlemcen, Algeria
Allali Hocine, Laboratory of Naturals Products and Bioactives, Tlemcen, Algeria; Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Aboubekr Belkaid University, Tlemcen, Algeria
Bouchentouf Amina Angelika, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Sciences, Djillali Liabes University, Sidi Bel Abbes, Algeria
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Abstract
Clove (Syzygium aromaticum) is precious spice used over the world in cuisine and medical treatment. Essential clove oil contains many bioactive molecules which have therapeutic interest. In this work we study interactions of DPP-4 enzyme (responsible of diabetes type 2) with main molecules contained in clove essential oil using molecular mechanic, molecular dynamics and molecular docking (method which predicts the preferred orientation of one molecule to a second when bound to each other to form a stable complex). Molecular Operating Environment software was used. The obtained results show that Acetyleugenol molecule is the best inhibitor of DPP-4 enzyme according to score energy. As a conclusion we can say that clove has a significant influence on diabetes treatment.
Keywords
Diabetes Type 2 (T2DM), Clove, DPP-4, MOE (Molecular Operating Environment)
To cite this article
Bouchentouf Salim, Ghalem Said, Missoum Noureddine, Allali Hocine, Bouchentouf Amina Angelika, A Note Study on Antidiabetic Effect of Main Molecules Contained in Clove Using Molecular Modeling Interactions with DPP-4 Enzyme, International Journal of Computational and Theoretical Chemistry. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2017, pp. 9-13. doi: 10.11648/j.ijctc.20170501.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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