An Examination of the Physio-mechanical Properties of Rock Lump and Aggregates in Three Leading Quarry Sites Near Accra
American Journal of Civil Engineering
Volume 4, Issue 6, November 2016, Pages: 264-275
Received: May 30, 2016; Accepted: Jul. 26, 2016; Published: Sep. 2, 2016
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Authors
Joseph Ignatius Teye Buertey, Department of Built Environment, Pentecost University College, Accra, Ghana
Felix Atsrim, Department of Built Environment, Pentecost University College, Accra, Ghana
Samuel Wilberforce Offei, Department of Project Management, Accra Institute of Technology, Accra, Ghana
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Abstract
In recent times, there has been an increasing indiscrimination in the choice of aggregate for the casting of concrete in the construction industry. The nearest available material is used without looking into its properties and strength. The source of aggregates and its physio-mechanical properties have an effect on the final product depending on the design mix. This study focusses on the determination of dry density, water content of rock materials, porosity, compressive strength of parent rock lumps material, rock aggregates and the grading of aggregates. Samples were picked from three leading quarries near Accra, Ghana and were tested quantitatively at the laboratory. Analysis shows that air spaces in rock lump samples with valued percentages varied from 29% to 34% and 41% for igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks respectively, with a direct proportional effect on the water content of the rock lump. Invariably, the dry density for sampled igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks lump varied from 1.12g/cm3 to 1.57g/cm3 and 2.03g/cm3 respectively. There was a direct correlation between the impact resistance and load resistance results of the samples. Igneous rock recorded the highest impact resistance of 802 mm followed by sedimentary and then metamorphic rocks with 602mm and 201mm respectively with a corresponding load resistance of 57kn, 29kn and 13kn. The studies revealed rock aggregate moisture contents as 8.1%, 7.6% and 10.7% translating into its water absorption and porosity of 10.25%, 14.11% and 7.55% for igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks respectively. The laboratory results with respect to grading of the aggregates for particle size distribution shows that sedimentary crush rocks showed a well graded particle size distribution, best suited for concrete works. Based on comparative laboratory analysis of the physio-mechanical properties of the three rocks, igneous rocks showed properties best suited for concrete mix design, whilst metamorphic rock samples proved to be the poorest.
Keywords
Concrete, Physio-mechanical Properties, Rock Sample, Aggregates, Strength, Construction
To cite this article
Joseph Ignatius Teye Buertey, Felix Atsrim, Samuel Wilberforce Offei, An Examination of the Physio-mechanical Properties of Rock Lump and Aggregates in Three Leading Quarry Sites Near Accra, American Journal of Civil Engineering. Vol. 4, No. 6, 2016, pp. 264-275. doi: 10.11648/j.ajce.20160406.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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