Compressive Strength of Manual and Machine Compacted Sandcrete Hollow Blocks Produced from Brands of Nigerian Cement
American Journal of Civil Engineering
Volume 3, Issue 2-3, March 2015, Pages: 6-9
Received: Dec. 12, 2014; Accepted: Jan. 23, 2015; Published: Apr. 11, 2015
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Authors
S. O. Odeyemi, Department of Civil Engineering, Federal Polytechnic Offa, Offa, Nigeria
O. O. Otunola, Department of Civil Engineering, Federal Polytechnic Offa, Offa, Nigeria
A. O. Adeyemi, Department of Civil Engineering, Federal Polytechnic Offa, Offa, Nigeria
W. O. Oyeniyan, Department of Civil Engineering, Federal Polytechnic Offa, Offa, Nigeria
M. Y. Olawuyi, Department of Civil Engineering, Federal Polytechnic Offa, Offa, Nigeria
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Abstract
This research investigated and compared the strength of manual with machine compacted sandcrete hollow blocks using Dangote and Elephant (Ordinary Portland) cement brands in Nigeria. Thirty two (32) samples were moulded from the two brands of cement i.e. sixteen (16) from each cement brand for both manual and machine compaction methods and were cured for 7, 14, 21, and 28days respectively. The result revealed that the 28th day average compressive strength of the block produced manually with the Dangote and Elephant brands of cement were 2.83N/mm2 and 2.89N/mm2 respectively, while the 28th day average compressive strength of machine compacted blocks from Dangote and Elephants brands of cement were 2.96N/mm2 and 3.03N/mm2 respectively. This result revealed that machine compacted blocks have a higher compressive strength than the manually compacted blocks. The result obtained for all the samples of the sandcrete blocks were within the Nigeria Industrial standard (NIS 87:2000) specification.
Keywords
Sandcrete Blocks, Compressive Strength, Manual Compaction, Machine Compaction, Ordinary Portland Cement
To cite this article
S. O. Odeyemi, O. O. Otunola, A. O. Adeyemi, W. O. Oyeniyan, M. Y. Olawuyi, Compressive Strength of Manual and Machine Compacted Sandcrete Hollow Blocks Produced from Brands of Nigerian Cement, American Journal of Civil Engineering. Special Issue: Predictive Estimation by ANSYS for Laminated Wood Deep Beam . Vol. 3, No. 2-3, 2015, pp. 6-9. doi: 10.11648/j.ajce.s.2015030203.12
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