Towards a Pattern-Based System Architecture for a Low Power, Low Cost Ultra-Light Aircraft Flight Controller
Software Engineering
Volume 7, Issue 3, September 2019, Pages: 46-52
Received: Jun. 24, 2019; Accepted: Jul. 23, 2019; Published: Aug. 15, 2019
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Authors
Joseph R. Laracy, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Seton Hall University, New Jersey, USA;Department of Systematic Theology, Seton Hall University, New Jersey, USA;Department of Catholic Studies, Seton Hall University, New Jersey, USA
Thomas Marlowe, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Seton Hall University, New Jersey, USA
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Abstract
The definition and application of software and hardware patterns have been a major and very positive development in the field of computer engineering, in tandem with the deployment of agile and process architecture methodologies. In this article, we show how five time-triggered, real time system patterns developed by Michael J. Pont can be effectively employed to architect a low power, low cost flight controller. We adopt and apply Pont’s powerful pattern language for our research. The target platform is an ultra-light aircraft with tight constraints on mass and volume of any control hardware. Ultra-light in this context means that the aircraft has only one seat; weighs less than 254 pounds (115 kg) empty weight; has a maximum fuel capacity of 5 U.S. gallons (19 L); and has a top speed of 55 knots (102 km/h; 63 mph) calibrated airspeed at full power in level flight. We utilize the reliable Infineon C515C microcontroller, a member of the classic 8051 family of controllers for the hardware platform. This research makes a contribution to the engineering cybernetic issues of human-machine interface and control of an ultra-light aircraft.
Keywords
Architectural Patterns, Embedded Systems, Flight Controls, Real Time Systems, Cybernetics
To cite this article
Joseph R. Laracy, Thomas Marlowe, Towards a Pattern-Based System Architecture for a Low Power, Low Cost Ultra-Light Aircraft Flight Controller, Software Engineering. Vol. 7, No. 3, 2019, pp. 46-52. doi: 10.11648/j.se.20190703.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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