Kinetic Modelling of Vitamin C Degradation in Leafy Vegetables during Blanching
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Volume 2, Issue 4, December 2017, Pages: 173-179
Received: Jun. 20, 2017; Accepted: Aug. 29, 2017; Published: Sep. 12, 2017
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Authors
Nuhu Mamman Musa, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University, Bauchi, Nigeria; Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Hull, Hull, United Kingdom
Maryam Ibrahim, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University, Bauchi, Nigeria
Saratu Yakubu, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Bauchi State University Gadau, Bauchi, Nigeria
Usman Aliyu Mohammed, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University, Bauchi, Nigeria
Atuman Samaila Joel, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University, Bauchi, Nigeria
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Abstract
Three different commonly used leafy vegetables in Nigeria (moringa oleifera, hibiscus esculentus and hibiscus sabdarifa) were analysed for their ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) contents. The vegetables were blanched in a steam blancher for 1- 6 minutes to analyse the effect of blanching time on their vitamin C content. Hibiscus esculentus had the lowest ascorbic acid content while hibiscus sabdarifa had the highest of Vitamin C concentration before blanching. After blanching for 6 minutes, hibiscus esculentus, Moringa oleifera and Hibiscus esculantus lost 69.7%, 64.2% and 54.2% of their initial Vitamin C contents respectively. Integral fitting of the experimental data shows that the kinetic degradation of ascorbic acid in all three vegetables follows first order reaction mechanism. The kinetic model parameters were determined using the integral method of data analysis for each vegetable. The pattern of ascorbic acid degradation in all the three vegetables was similar despite their different initial contents.
Keywords
Moringa Oleifera, Hibiscus Esculentus, Hibiscus Sabdarifa, Ascorbic Acid, Kinetic Modelling
To cite this article
Nuhu Mamman Musa, Maryam Ibrahim, Saratu Yakubu, Usman Aliyu Mohammed, Atuman Samaila Joel, Kinetic Modelling of Vitamin C Degradation in Leafy Vegetables during Blanching, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. Vol. 2, No. 4, 2017, pp. 173-179. doi: 10.11648/j.cbe.20170204.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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