Quality of Monitoring and Evaluation of Malaria Control Activities: Tracking Stock-Outs and Replenishment of Supplies in Anambra State, Nigeria
Science Journal of Public Health
Volume 1, Issue 5, November 2013, Pages: 201-208
Received: Aug. 23, 2013; Published: Oct. 20, 2013
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Authors
Jane Chinelo Enemuoh, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu, Nigeria; Department of Community Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu, Nigeria
Obinna Emmanuel Onwujekwe, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu, Nigeria; Department of Health Administration and Management, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu, Nigeria
Benjamin Sunday Chudi Uzochukwu, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu, Nigeria; Department of Community Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu, Nigeria; Department of Health Administration and Management, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu, Nigeria
Joseph Oranuba, Ministry of Health, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria
Amobi Linus Ilika, Department of Community Medicine, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi, Nigeria
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Abstract
Introduction: The use of monitoring and evaluation (M&E) data is recognized as a major factor in the improvement and strengthening of malaria control programmes. This study assesses the quality of M&E in malaria control, with special emphasis on use of M&E to detect and control stock-outs of drugs and other supplies. Methods:The study was undertaken in Anambra state, southeat Nigeria. Training on M&E was used to improve health workers practice on the use of M&E tools for malaria control. Data was collected from 210 health workers in the surveyed public health facilities using questionnaire to monitor and evaluate health workers knowledge and practice on the use of M&E tools as well as on control for tracking stock-outs. Data on Observations were also collected on the completeness of the facilities’ store records, commodity tracking systems and completed M&E forms. Results: A total of 54(25.6%) of the respondents had attended a training on the use of M&E tools. Stock-out of malaria commodities was high, especially Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). It took a long time for stock-outs to be reported to a higher level and replenished. The main reason for stock-outs was ineffective communication. In most cases, there were no feedbacks of data transmitted from lower to higher levels of the M&E stratum. Conclusions: The quality of malaria M&E is still sub-optimal leading to stock-out of malaria control commodities. Adequate strategies should be designed by programme managers so as to enhance more effective M&E for improved malaria control.
Keywords
Malaria, Monitoring and Evaluation, Stock-out
To cite this article
Jane Chinelo Enemuoh, Obinna Emmanuel Onwujekwe, Benjamin Sunday Chudi Uzochukwu, Joseph Oranuba, Amobi Linus Ilika, Quality of Monitoring and Evaluation of Malaria Control Activities: Tracking Stock-Outs and Replenishment of Supplies in Anambra State, Nigeria, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 1, No. 5, 2013, pp. 201-208. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20130105.13
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