Exclusive Breastfeeding up to Six Months is Very Rare in Tanzania: A Cohort Study of Infant Feeding Practices in Kilimanjaro Area
Science Journal of Public Health
Volume 3, Issue 2, March 2015, Pages: 251-258
Received: Feb. 9, 2015; Accepted: Feb. 27, 2015; Published: Mar. 10, 2015
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Authors
Tamara H. Hussein, Better Health for African Mother and Child, Moshi, Tanzania
Melina Mgongo, Better Health for African Mother and Child, Moshi, Tanzania
Jacqueline G. Uriyo, Better Health for African Mother and Child, Moshi, Tanzania; Division of Women and Children, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet and University of Oslo Norway
Damian J. Damian, Community Health Department, KCMC Hospital, Moshi, Tanzania; Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College (KCMU Co), Moshi, Tanzania
Babill Stray-Pedersen, Division of Women and Children, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet and University of Oslo Norway
Sia E. Msuya, Better Health for African Mother and Child, Moshi, Tanzania; Community Health Department, KCMC Hospital, Moshi, Tanzania; Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College (KCMU Co), Moshi, Tanzania
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Abstract
Background: Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) is recommended the first six months after birth as one of cost effective interventions in saving children's lives. Objective: To determine the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding and describe the common foods introduced to infants before 6months. Design: A prospective cohort study. Setting: Poor community of Moshi urban, Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania. Subjects: Women in their third trimester and were followed to 18 months after delivery. A questionnaire was used to collect information on maternal socio-demographics, delivery status and infant feeding practices at each visit. Maternal HIV status was checked at enrolment. Results: Out of 2231 women, with a live birth, 70% (1535) came back at least once after delivery and information on infant feeding were collected. 94% of the women were living below the poverty line. The prevalence of EBF at 1, 3 and up to 6 months was 48.8%, 22.0% and 0.2% respectively. Two percent of the infants were given semi-solids at 1 month, 35% at 3 months and 95% at 5 months. Water and cow’s milk were the most common liquids introduced to infants by one month, while porridge, cow’s milk and mtori were commonly introduced at 3 months. Conclusions: EBF up to 6 month is very rare in Kilimanjaro. There is an urgent need to strengthen community and health facility based EBF interventions so as to reach the 90% recommended coverage by the WHO. This will help in improving child survival and in attaining the Millennium Development Goal 4.
Keywords
Exclusive Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding, Poverty, Prevalence, Tanzania
To cite this article
Tamara H. Hussein, Melina Mgongo, Jacqueline G. Uriyo, Damian J. Damian, Babill Stray-Pedersen, Sia E. Msuya, Exclusive Breastfeeding up to Six Months is Very Rare in Tanzania: A Cohort Study of Infant Feeding Practices in Kilimanjaro Area, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 3, No. 2, 2015, pp. 251-258. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20150302.24
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