Indoor Air Quality and Perceived Health Effects Experienced by Occupants of an Office Complex in a Typical Tertiary Institution in Nigeria
Science Journal of Public Health
Volume 3, Issue 4, July 2015, Pages: 552-558
Received: Apr. 7, 2015; Accepted: Apr. 21, 2015; Published: Jun. 8, 2015
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Authors
Morakinyo Oyewale Mayowa, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
Ana Godson Rowland, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
Hammed Taiwo Babatunde, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
Adejumo Mumuni, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
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Abstract
Exposure to compromised indoor air is one of the factors affecting the health and productivity of workers in the workplace. Studies have proved that the number of related health complaints from workplace has increased in recent years. Indoor air quality and perceived health effects experienced by occupants of selected offices and classrooms in the Oladele Ajose Building (OAJB) were assessed in this study. Temperature and Relative Humidity (RH) of seven indoor locations within OAJB were monitored using Multi-Tester N21FR during the dry season. Values obtained for temperature and RH were compared with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) guideline limits for indoor environment of 23.5 – 25.5°C and 30 – 50% respectively. Airborne Total Bacteria Count (TBC) and Total Fungi Count (TFC) were determined using Polish Standard PN 89/Z-04008/08 and values obtained compared with the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) guideline limit of 500cfu/m3 for total airborne microbial count in an indoor environment. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to elicit information from staff and students. Data collected were analysed using descriptive statistics. Mean indoor temperature and RH in the morning were 30.3±2.5 °C and 30.5±2.1% respectively and 66.5±5.6°C and 66.6±5.6% respectively in the afternoon. The TBC and TFC were lower than guideline limit. Bacterial species isolated included Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, Pseudomonas and Proteus while fungi specie includes Aspergillus. Mean age of respondents was 31.4±8.9 years. Reported symptoms in the last six months prior the study include cough (65.5%), fatigue (81.0%) and wheezing (87.9%). Temperature and RH of the sampled locations were higher than acceptable limits. These together with the airborne microbes may influence the prevalence of health symptoms experienced by respondents. Routine air monitoring of office buildings should be carried out to ensure conformance with stipulated guidelines.
Keywords
Indoor Air Quality, Perceived Health Effects, Workplace, Ibadan
To cite this article
Morakinyo Oyewale Mayowa, Ana Godson Rowland, Hammed Taiwo Babatunde, Adejumo Mumuni, Indoor Air Quality and Perceived Health Effects Experienced by Occupants of an Office Complex in a Typical Tertiary Institution in Nigeria, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 3, No. 4, 2015, pp. 552-558. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20150304.24
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