A Study of Prevalence of Blood Group of Saudi Patients in King Abdulaziz Medical City-Riyadh
Science Journal of Public Health
Volume 3, Issue 4, July 2015, Pages: 559-562
Received: May 19, 2015; Accepted: May 28, 2015; Published: Jun. 11, 2015
Views 4123      Downloads 104
Authors
Mohieldin Elsayid, Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Younes Yahya Aseeri, Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Faisal Al Saqri, Blood Bank Centre, King Abdul Aziz Medical City, National Guards Health Affairs, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Abdullah Alanazi, Department of Emergency Medical Services, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Shoeb Qureshi, Research Methodology Unit, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
Background: Blood groups have been the subject of research because of the importance of blood transfusion in surgery as well as treatment of anemia and other hemorrhagic conditions. Blood groups and immune hematological problems of blood transfusion constitute an extremely interesting, but complex study area and their investigations have much to offer to hematology and immunohematology fields. Aim: The aim of our study is to provide essential data about the distribution of ABO and Rhesus blood groups among Saudi populations and to determine the ABO and Rh phenotype among patients who received blood or blood products in King Abdulaziz Medical City-Riyadh. Methods: For this purpose, we retrospectively evaluated the results of ABO grouping and Rh grouping performed among some patients who received blood or blood products at King Abdulaziz Medical City Riyadh during the year 2013. Results: Participants in this study included four hundred patients (100 children; 28 youths, 88 adults and 184 olds). The gender distribution showed 232 males and 168 females. ABO phenotypes result showed that blood group A is 27%, group B 22%, group AB 3%, and group O is 48%. The percentages of positive and negative Rh grouping phenotypes were 96% and 4%, respectively. Conclusion: In conclusion, our study shows that the blood group O is highly frequent among Saudi population, while the blood group AB is the lowest. Rh-negative phenotypes were not as frequent as Rh-positive.
Keywords
ABO Phenotypes, Rh Phenotypes, ABO Blood Group, ABO Antigens, Rh Antigens
To cite this article
Mohieldin Elsayid, Younes Yahya Aseeri, Faisal Al Saqri, Abdullah Alanazi, Shoeb Qureshi, A Study of Prevalence of Blood Group of Saudi Patients in King Abdulaziz Medical City-Riyadh, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 3, No. 4, 2015, pp. 559-562. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20150304.25
References
[1]
Worlledge S, Ogiemudia SE, Thomas CO, Ikoku BN, Luzzatto L. Blood group antigens and antibodies in Nigeria. Ann Trop Med Parasitol. 1974 Sep; 68(3):249-64.
[2]
Jeremiah, Z.A &Buseri, F.I. (2003). Rh antigen and phenotype frequencies and probable genotypes for the four main ethnic groups in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Immunohematology, 19(3):86-88.
[3]
Mollison, P. L., Engelfriet, C. P. &Marcelac. (1997). Blood transfusion in clinical medicine. 10th edition, Oxford Blackwell scientific publications.
[4]
Mouro, I., Colin, Y., Chérif-Zahar, B., Cartron, J. P. & Le Van Kim C. (1993). Molecular genetic basis of the human Rhesus blood group system. Nature Genet, 5:62-65.
[5]
Hoffbrand A.V and Pettit. A.E,(2001). Post graduates hematology,4th edition British library , London.
[6]
Genetic. In:laird fryer b Daniels G Levitt’s (eds) , (1990) Blood group system kell, Arlington VA American association of blood banks.
[7]
Kamla-Raj (,2009) , Anthropologist, 11(3): 237-238 (2009) , K. S. N. Reddy and G. Sudha , Department of Anthropology, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517 502, Andhra Pradesh, India.
[8]
Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517 502, Andhra Pradesh, India.
[9]
Brown, T. A. (1992). Genetics: A Molecular Approach. Singapore: Fong & sons printers; pp: 309-327.
[10]
Dacie JV, Lewis SM. Practical hematology. In: Lewis SM, Bain BJ, Bates I, editors. 9th ed. London: Churchill Livingstone, Harcourt Publishers Limited; 2001. pp. 444–51.
[11]
Vengelen-Tyler, editor. Technical manual. 12th ed. Bethesda MD: American Association of Blood Banks; 1996.
[12]
Polesky HF. Blood group, human leukocytes antigens and DNA polymorphism in parenting testing. In: Henry JB, editor. Clinical diagnosis and management by laboratory methods. 19th ed. Philadelphelphia: WB Saunders; 1996. pp. 1413–26.
[13]
Sakharov RS, Nofal' KhK. The frequency of ABO blood groups and the expression of group antigens and isohemagglutinins in Syrian Arabs. Sud Med Ekspert. 1996 Apr-Jun;39(2):34-6.
[14]
Abu-Sin AY, Ayoub M, Abdelrazig H. Antenatal blood group serology in Sudanese women. Vox Sang. 1978; 34(6):347-50.
[15]
Egesie UG1, Egesie OJ, Usar I, Johnbull TO. Distribution of ABO, Rhesus blood and haemoglobin electrophoresis among the undergraduate students of Niger Delta State University, Nigeria. Niger J Physiol Sci. 2008 Jun-Dec; 23(1-2):5-8.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186