Evidence of Co and Triple Infections of Hepatitis B and C Amongst HIV Infected Pregnant Women in Buea, Cameroon
Science Journal of Public Health
Volume 4, Issue 2, March 2016, Pages: 127-131
Received: Jan. 17, 2016; Accepted: Feb. 1, 2016; Published: Mar. 28, 2016
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Authors
George Mondinde Ikomey, Center for the Study and Control of Communicable Diseases (CSCCD), Department of Microbiology, Haematology, Parasitology and Infectious Diseases of Medicine, University of Yaoundé, Yaounde, Cameroon
Graeme Brendon Jacobs, Division of Medical Virology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Tygerberg, South Africa
Becky Tanjong, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Buea, Buea, Cameroon
Martha Tongo Mesembe, Center for the Study and Control of Communicable Diseases (CSCCD), Department of Microbiology, Haematology, Parasitology and Infectious Diseases of Medicine, University of Yaoundé, Yaounde, Cameroon
Agnes Eyoh, Center for the Study and Control of Communicable Diseases (CSCCD), Department of Microbiology, Haematology, Parasitology and Infectious Diseases of Medicine, University of Yaoundé, Yaounde, Cameroon
Emilia Lyonga, Center for the Study and Control of Communicable Diseases (CSCCD), Department of Microbiology, Haematology, Parasitology and Infectious Diseases of Medicine, University of Yaoundé, Yaounde, Cameroon
Ebot Mfoataw, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Buea, Buea, Cameroon
Rose Ngoh, Center for the Study and Control of Communicable Diseases (CSCCD), Department of Microbiology, Haematology, Parasitology and Infectious Diseases of Medicine, University of Yaoundé, Yaounde, Cameroon
Cynthia Raissa Tamandjou, Division of Medical Virology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Tygerberg, South Africa
Greg Ikomey, Center for the Study and Control of Communicable Diseases (CSCCD), Department of Microbiology, Haematology, Parasitology and Infectious Diseases of Medicine, University of Yaoundé, Yaounde, Cameroon
Marie Claire Okomo Assoumou, Center for the Study and Control of Communicable Diseases (CSCCD), Department of Microbiology, Haematology, Parasitology and Infectious Diseases of Medicine, University of Yaoundé, Yaounde, Cameroon
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Abstract
Little epidermiological data is available on the prevalence of HIV, Hepatitis B and C, Co-and or triple infection during pregnancy in Cameroon as well as many other resource limited settings. HIV and Hepatitis B and C are major public health concerns world wide. Our study aimed at assessing the seroprevalence of Hepatitis B and C amongst HIV infected pregnant women in Buea, located in the Southwest region of Cameroon. A Cross-sectional study on consented pregnant women were conducted from March 2015 to August 2015. HIV-1 infections were detected using the national HIV-1 test algorithms. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), anti-HBe and anti- Hepatitis C (anti-HCV) were detected using Enzyme linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISAs). Of the 1230 recruited pregnant women, 97/1230 (7.8%) (95% CI: 3.5, 29.0%) were confirmed HIV-1 positive. HIV/HBV co-infection were observed in 14/97 (14.4%) (95% CI: 39.8, 100%), whilst 11/97 (11.3 %; 95% CI: 27.5, 100%) were HIV/HCV co-infections. Two HIV-infected pregnant women (8/97(8.2%; 95% CI: 0.1, 17.2%)) were HIV/HBV/HCV triple-infected. Anti-HBc was detected in all HBV-infected pregnant women (14/14; (100.0%)) (95.0% CI: 39.8, 100.0%). Seropositivity for HIV-1 was higher (37%) amongst subjects aged between 32-37 years, whilst none was found above 40. From our results we conclude that Co- and triple infections of HIV, Hepatitis B and C were present amongst pregnant women in Buea. Epidemiological data generated from this study are limited due to the existence of triple infected. It will therefore serve as a guide to the government policies to reinforce screening, treatment and prevention strategies, through its Mother–to-Child–transmission (pMTCT) Programme nationwide.
Keywords
Hepatitis B and C, Cameroon, Co-infection
To cite this article
George Mondinde Ikomey, Graeme Brendon Jacobs, Becky Tanjong, Martha Tongo Mesembe, Agnes Eyoh, Emilia Lyonga, Ebot Mfoataw, Rose Ngoh, Cynthia Raissa Tamandjou, Greg Ikomey, Marie Claire Okomo Assoumou, Evidence of Co and Triple Infections of Hepatitis B and C Amongst HIV Infected Pregnant Women in Buea, Cameroon, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2016, pp. 127-131. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20160402.17
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Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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