Improvement of Community Health Outcomes in Kitgum District: Contributions of a Maternal Newborn and Child Health Project from June 2011 to July 2016
Science Journal of Public Health
Volume 5, Issue 1, January 2017, Pages: 10-19
Received: Nov. 17, 2016; Accepted: Dec. 1, 2016; Published: Dec. 26, 2016
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Authors
Babughirana Geoffrey, World Vision, Kampala, Uganda
Saul Onyango, Independent Scholar, Kampala, Uganda
Lorna Muhirwe Barungi, World Vision, Kampala, Uganda
Irene Mbugua, World Vision, Kampala, Uganda
Benon Musasizi, World Vision, Kampala, Uganda
Edgar Twinomujuni Rukambura, World Vision, Kampala, Uganda
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Abstract
The East African Maternal Newborn and Child Health (EAMNCH) project implemented in Kitgum District of Uganda with a goal to improve MNCH. The evaluation was conducted as a cross-sectional assessment that utilised both quantitative and qualitative data collection methods. The projects contribution to the goal included a 4% reduction in stunting levels, 5.9% increase in the number of women delivered by a skilled Birth attendant, 12.6% increment in pregnant women accessing Iron folic supplements and a 7% increment in utilization of ITN during pregnancy. Evidence from the quantitative household survey, key informant interviews and focus group discussions supported the contribution of project interventions to the reduction in infant and under-five child morbidity, reduction in maternal morbidity as well as mortality within the project areas.
Keywords
Community Health Outcomes, Maternal Newborn, Child Health, Health Systems Strengthening
To cite this article
Babughirana Geoffrey, Saul Onyango, Lorna Muhirwe Barungi, Irene Mbugua, Benon Musasizi, Edgar Twinomujuni Rukambura, Improvement of Community Health Outcomes in Kitgum District: Contributions of a Maternal Newborn and Child Health Project from June 2011 to July 2016, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2017, pp. 10-19. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20170501.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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