Caregivers Knowledge, Attitude and Practices on Child Growth Monitoring and Promotion Activities in Lawra District, Upper West Region of Ghana
Science Journal of Public Health
Volume 5, Issue 1, January 2017, Pages: 20-30
Received: Nov. 17, 2016; Accepted: Dec. 5, 2016; Published: Jan. 4, 2017
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Authors
Debora Tuobom Debuo, Department of Family and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Ghana
Prince Kubi Appiah, Department of Family and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Ghana
Margaret Kweku, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Ghana
Geoffrey Adebayo Asalu, Department of Family and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Ghana
Seth Yao Ahiabor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Ghana
Wisdom Kwami Takramah, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Ghana
Abdulai Bonchel Duut, Department of Social Work, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra, Ghana
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Abstract
Background: Growth monitoring and promotion (GMP) activities serve as an important platform for the implementation of child survival interventions to reduce malnutrition, infectious diseases and death among children. In recent times, there has been a steady decline in GMP outcome indicators in the Lawra district. The appropriate practices of GMP help in improving knowledge, attitudes and practices of caregivers towards child nutrition and health. Therefore, this study seeks to assess knowledge, attitude and practices of growth monitoring and promotion and associated factors among caregivers. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study design was used to study 300 caregivers’. Multi-stage sampling technique was used to select the participants. A semi-structured questionnaire applying face to face interview approach was used to collect data from participants. Descriptive statistics and associations between dependent and independent variables were done using Pearson chi-square and logistic regression analysis. Results: The results indicated 53% of the caregivers’ with good (high) knowledge in Growth Monitoring and Promotion (GMP) activities, 98% with good (high) attitudes towards GMP activities and 70% with good (high) practices in GMP. Also, 16.2% of caregivers’ children had faltered in growth. Occupation was associated with knowledge (p=.013), and attitude (p=.014). Again, educational status (p=.026) was associated with knowledge in GMP, marital status (p=.009) and child relation with caregiver (p=.021) were associated with attitude in GMP. Also tribe (p=.019) and child relation with caregiver (p=.019) were significantly associated with practices in GMP. Conclusions: Notwithstanding the achievement in the coverage of GMP, implementation of Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) program and Information, Education and Communication (IE&C) activities in district, the findings on GMP outcome (knowledge and practice) is not satisfactorily. District Health Directorate need to intensify and strengthen IYCF activities, home visits, health education, and growth monitoring and promotion services.
Keywords
Knowledge, Attitude, Practice, Growth Monitoring and Promotion, Caregiver
To cite this article
Debora Tuobom Debuo, Prince Kubi Appiah, Margaret Kweku, Geoffrey Adebayo Asalu, Seth Yao Ahiabor, Wisdom Kwami Takramah, Abdulai Bonchel Duut, Caregivers Knowledge, Attitude and Practices on Child Growth Monitoring and Promotion Activities in Lawra District, Upper West Region of Ghana, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2017, pp. 20-30. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20170501.13
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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