Comparative Study on Changes in Spirometric Lung Function Indices of Cobblestone Workers
Science Journal of Public Health
Volume 5, Issue 2, March 2017, Pages: 98-102
Received: Dec. 1, 2016; Accepted: Dec. 10, 2016; Published: Feb. 17, 2017
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Author
Hailemariam H. Mamo, Department of Biological Sciences, Dire Dawa University, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Cobblestone workers exposed to dust inhalation and physical injuries during cobblestone work activities exposed to respiratory problems due to proliferation and fibrotic alteration changing in their spiro metric lung function indices. This study was designed to determine changes in spirometric lung function indices of cobblestone workers. Comparative cross-sectional study was applied. Cobblestone workers exposed for one and above years and proportional non exposed non-smoking normal study participants with similar age range and anthropometric values were participated. The study showed higher change in Spiro metric lung function indices. Mean values and percent predicted mean values of lung functions (FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC, PEFR, PIFR and FEF25-75) were significantly reduced (p<0.05). Reduction in spirometric values was more marked in chiseling workers. Thus, dust emission during cobblestone preparation adversely affects pulmonary function of workers. Further studies should be conducted on many workers to make standing decisions and regulations. Workers should be trained and appropriate PPEs should be provided. Guideline has to be developed to provide guidance on how to assess and reduce health impacts of dust emissions.
Keywords
Cobblestone Workers, Lung Function Indices, Spirometry
To cite this article
Hailemariam H. Mamo, Comparative Study on Changes in Spirometric Lung Function Indices of Cobblestone Workers, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2017, pp. 98-102. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20170502.16
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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