Prevalence and Management Practices of Low Back Pain Among Commercial Motorcyclists in Ilesa Southwest, Nigeria
Science Journal of Public Health
Volume 5, Issue 3, May 2017, Pages: 186-191
Received: Jun. 10, 2016; Accepted: Jul. 29, 2016; Published: Mar. 20, 2017
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Authors
Olorunfemi Akinbode Ogundele, Department of Community Health and Primary Care, State Specialist Hospital, Ondo City, Nigeria
Olusegun Temitope Afolabi, Department of Community Health, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria
Funmito Omolola Fehintola, Department of Community Medicine, Bowen University Teaching Hospital, Ogbomoso, Nigeria
Abimbola Olorunsola, Department of Family Medicine, State Specialist Hospital, Ondo City, Nigeria
Alex Adelosoye, Department of Family Medicine, State Specialist Hospital, Ondo City, Nigeria
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Abstract
Commercial motorcycling is fast becoming a recognised occupational group especially among the young people in Nigeria. Work-related Low back pain (LBP) may not be uncommon among them. This study assessed the prevalence and management practices of Low back pain among commercial motorcyclists in Ilesa Southwest, Nigeria. The study was a descriptive cross-sectional study. A systematic random sampling technique was used to select the required study subjects. Quantitative data collection method was employed. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 20.0. All the 393 respondents were male, 64.1% had secondary education. The mean age of respondent was 31.3 (SD±4.5) years and the mean monthly income was 22,400 (SD±10,700) Nigerian naira. Fifty-four percent were full-time commercial motorcyclist. About 41% reported ever having LBP while 23% had LBP in the last 7 days prior to the study. Only 5.9% had ever been hospitalised because of LBP. Statistically, significant association exist between LBP and age of respondent (p<0.001), the length of years as a commercial motorcyclist (p<0.016), sitting position on the motorcycle and working full time as a commercial motorcyclist (p<0.001). This study concluded that LBP is prevalent among commercial motorcyclist. There is a need for enlightenment programmes on how to avoid or possibly reduce the risk of LBP.
Keywords
Low Back Pain, Commercial Motorcyclists, Prevalence
To cite this article
Olorunfemi Akinbode Ogundele, Olusegun Temitope Afolabi, Funmito Omolola Fehintola, Abimbola Olorunsola, Alex Adelosoye, Prevalence and Management Practices of Low Back Pain Among Commercial Motorcyclists in Ilesa Southwest, Nigeria, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 5, No. 3, 2017, pp. 186-191. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20170503.15
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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