Patient Factors Which Contribute to Non-adherence to TB Treatment in Kericho and Nakuru Counties of Kenya
Science Journal of Public Health
Volume 5, Issue 4, July 2017, Pages: 329-334
Received: Apr. 25, 2017; Accepted: May 15, 2017; Published: Jul. 3, 2017
Views 1813      Downloads 57
Authors
Richard Kiplangat Arap Sang, Community Health Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Egerton University, Nakuru, Kenya
Ronald Omenge Obwoge, Community Health Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Egerton University, Nakuru, Kenya
Simon Kangethe, Medical Education, Moi University, Eldoret, Kenya
Laban Peter Ayiro, Moi University, Quality Assurance, Eldoret, Kenya
Johnson Masai Changeiywo, Instruction and Educational Management Department, Egerton University, Nakuru, Kenya
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a major cause of high morbidity and mortality in Kenya. Adherence to TB treatment is one of the interventions that lead to increase in cure rate thus reducing mortality and emergence of Multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR) and high cost of treatment. This study focused on TB patients in urban and rural areas of Kericho and Nakuru Counties. The study was to determine the patient factors which contribute to non-adherence to TB treatment. A purposive sampling method was used to carry out a cross sectional descriptive survey with retrospective cohort of non-adherent TB patients. Target population was smear positive TB patients registered in the TB registers in the two counties, within the past six months at the commencement date of the study. Data was collected using adopted/ developed observation forms/checklists, interview schedules and questionnaires. Respondents were traced non-adherent smear positive TB patients (defaulters), care supporters and health care workers. Collected data was analyzed using SPSS platform. Age, gender, inadequate knowledge, ignorance on need for treatment adherence, stigma, alcoholism, social and economic factors such as low income, lack of social support, low education, financial problems, drug side effects were analyzed. Feeling well soon after medication initiation, drug side effects, low educational level, poor financial status, unemployment, shortage of Tb drugs including unavailability of pyridoxine which is essential in counteracting drug side effects and were associated with defaulting. Staff should also intensify adherence counselling targeting effect of personal factor to adherence. The County of Nakuru and Kericho’s Ministry of Health to increase awareness on Tb and make the public aware of the importance of TB control.
Keywords
Non-Adherence, TB Treatment, Defaulter, Patient Factor, Tuberculosis
To cite this article
Richard Kiplangat Arap Sang, Ronald Omenge Obwoge, Simon Kangethe, Laban Peter Ayiro, Johnson Masai Changeiywo, Patient Factors Which Contribute to Non-adherence to TB Treatment in Kericho and Nakuru Counties of Kenya, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 5, No. 4, 2017, pp. 329-334. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20170504.18
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
[1]
World Health Organization (WHO) (2012) Global Tuberculosis Report 2012. Geneva: WHO,.http://www.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/75938/1/9789241564502_eng.pdf. Accessed April 15, 2013).
[2]
Raviglione, M., Marais, B., Floyd, K., Lönnroth, K., Getahun, H., Migliori, G. B. & Chakaya, J. (2012). Scaling up interventions to achieve global tuberculosis control: progress and new developments. The Lancet, 379 (9829), 1902-1913.
[3]
Jensen, P. A., Lambert, L. A., Iademarco, M. F., Ridzon, R., & Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2005). Guidelines for preventing the transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in health-care settings, 2005. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
[4]
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2005). Guidelines for preventing the transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in health-care settings, 2005. MMWr, 54 (RR-17), 2-107.
[5]
Mohamed I. M. I, Abdul W, Al S, Adel (2013) Factors affecting patients' compliance to anti-tuberculosis treatment in Yemen, Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research 4 (2), 115–122.
[6]
Bagoes W, Michelle G, Maartje D. (2009) Factors that influence treatment adherence of tuberculosis patients living in Java, Indonesia Dovepress Journal 3, 231- 238.
[7]
Salla A. M, Simon A. L, Helen J. S, Mark E. E, Atle F, Jimmy V (2007) Patient Adherence to Tuberculosis Treatment: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Research DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0040238.
[8]
World Health Organization. (2013) Global tuberculosis report 2013. http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/91355/1/9789241564656_eng.pdf?ua=1. Access 2014 June 2.
[9]
Zhao Y, Xu S, Wang L, Chin DP, Wang S, Jiang G, (2012) National survey of drug-resistant tuberculosis in China. New England Journal Medicine. 366:2161–2170. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1108789.
[10]
Vijay S, Balasangameswara VH, Jagannatha PS, Saroja VN and Kumar P (2003) Defaults among Tuberculosis Patients Treated under DOTS in Bangalore City: A Search for Solution. Indian Journal of Tuberculosis.; 50, 185-196.
[11]
Xu W, Lu W, Zhou Y, Zhu L, Shen H and Wang J (2009). Adherence to Anti-Tuberculosis Treatment among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients: A. Qualitative Study. BMC Health Service Research; 9, 169.
[12]
World Health Organization Global Tuberculosis Report 2013.www.who.int(Accessed on 5th May 2014).
[13]
Warker R. and Edward C (2004) The Chemotherapy of Tuberculosis. Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutic. 3rd Edition. Churchill Livingstone., pp 583-93.
[14]
Ministry of Health: National Leprosy and Tuberculosis Guideline (MOH/NLTP), 2005.http://www.nltp.co.ke/docs/National_NLTP_Guideline.pdf(Accessed on March 19th, 2014).
[15]
Burman, W. J., Cohn, D. L., Rietmeijer, C. A., Judson, F. N., Sbarbaro, J. A., & Reves, R. R. (1997). Short-term incarceration for the management of noncompliance with tuberculosis treatment. Chest, 112(1), 57-62.
[16]
Jha, U. M., Satyanarayana, S., Dewan, P. K., Chadha, S., Wares, F., Sahu, S.,... & Chauhan, L. S. (2010). Risk factors for treatment default among re-treatment tuberculosis patients in India, 2006. PLoS One, 5(1), e8873.
[17]
Horna-Campos, O. J., Consiglio, E., Sánchez-Pérez, H. J., Navarro, A., Caylà, J. A., & Martín-Mateo, M. (2010). Pulmonary tuberculosis infection among workers in the informal public transport sector in Lima, Peru. Occupational and environmental medicine, oem-2009.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186