Prevalence of Rotavirus in Under 5 Year Old Children Hospitalized for Acute Gastroenteritis, Swaziland, 2013 - 2014
Science Journal of Public Health
Volume 5, Issue 4, July 2017, Pages: 353-358
Received: May 4, 2017; Accepted: May 16, 2017; Published: Jul. 26, 2017
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Authors
Gugu Maphalala, National Reference Laboratory, Swaziland Health Laboratory Services, Mbabane, Swaziland
Goitom Weldegebriel, World Health Organization, Inter country support team for East and Southern Africa, Zimbabwe, Harare
Nomcebo Phungwayo, National Reference Laboratory, Swaziland Health Laboratory Services, Mbabane, Swaziland
Eunice Ruhinda, Mbabane Government Hospital, Mbabane, Swaziland
Njabulo Lukhele, Mbabane Government Hospital, Mbabane, Swaziland
Getahun Tsegaye, Raleigh Fitkin Memorial Hospital, Manzini, Swaziland
Gilbert Masona, Raleigh Fitkin Memorial Hospital, Manzini, Swaziland
Nomsa Nomcebo Dube, Ministry of Health, EPI, Mbabane, Swaziland
Nonhlanhla Dlamini, Ministry of Health, EPI, Mbabane, Swaziland
Angel Dlamini, Ministry of Health, EPI, Mbabane, Swaziland
Philile Shabangu, World Health Organization, Mbabane, Swaziland
Lonkululeko Khumalo, World Health Organization, Mbabane, Swaziland
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Abstract
Background: Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhoea among children < 5 years of age worldwide. To determine the prevalence of severe rotavirus infection in children admitted with acute gastroenteritis attending Mbabane Government Referral Hospital in the Hhohho region and Raleigh Fitkin Memorial (RFM) Hospital in the Manzini Region of Swaziland, sentinel surveillance was conducted in January 2013 – December 2014. Methods: This is hospital based sentinel surveillance study. A total of 331 children under the age of five years with acute diarrhoea that were admitted to the hospitals were enrolled into the sentinel surveillance and 302 cases had stool samples tested for rotavirus antigens by enzyme immunoassay ProSpec T Rotavirus kit. The G and P genotypes were established by multiplex nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results: Rotavirus was detected in 159 (52.6%) of the 302 children with acute diarrhoea that had stool specimens collected and 108 (68%) of positive cases of rotavirus gastroenteritis were between 6-11 months of age and 91% were below the age of two years. Rotavirus infection occurred with peaks between June - August. During the 2013 – 2014 period, 146 samples were subjected for reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and genotyping assays. The most common genotypes detected in Swaziland were 82% G2P [4] in 2013 and 93% G1P [8] in 2014. Conclusion: Swaziland would benefit by introducing rotavirus vaccine and hence reduce the hospitalization burden of managing acute diarrhoea cases attributed to Rotavirus. The data from the sentinel hospitals can also be used to monitor the effectiveness of the vaccine once introduced. 1. National Reference Laboratory, Ministry of health, Swaziland- MOH 2. World Health Organization, Inter country support team for East and Southern Africa, Zimbabwe, Harare, 3. Ministry of health, Swaziland 4. World Health Organization, Swaziland 5. Mbabane Government Hospital, Swaziland 6. Raleigh Fitkin Memorial Hospital, Swaziland
Keywords
Diarrhoea, Rotavirus, Prevalence, Genotypes, Swaziland
To cite this article
Gugu Maphalala, Goitom Weldegebriel, Nomcebo Phungwayo, Eunice Ruhinda, Njabulo Lukhele, Getahun Tsegaye, Gilbert Masona, Nomsa Nomcebo Dube, Nonhlanhla Dlamini, Angel Dlamini, Philile Shabangu, Lonkululeko Khumalo, Prevalence of Rotavirus in Under 5 Year Old Children Hospitalized for Acute Gastroenteritis, Swaziland, 2013 - 2014, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 5, No. 4, 2017, pp. 353-358. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20170504.22
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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