An Autopsic Examination Case of Diagnosed Brugada Syndrome
American Journal of Internal Medicine
Volume 2, Issue 4, July 2014, Pages: 79-82
Received: Jul. 17, 2014; Accepted: Jul. 30, 2014; Published: Aug. 10, 2014
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Authors
Satoshi Furukawa, Department of Legal Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan; Department of Legal Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa, Otsu City, Shiga 520-2192, Japan
Satomu Morita, Department of Legal Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan
Hayato Okunaga, Department of Legal Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan
Lisa Wingenfeld, Department of Legal Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan
Akari Takaya, Department of Legal Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan
Tokiko Nakagawa, Department of Legal Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan
Ikuo Sakaguchi, Department of Legal Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan
Yoshio Yamamoto, Iga Research Institute of Mie University, Mie, Japan
Takasi Ashihara, Department of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan
Minoru Horie, Department of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan
Katsuji Nishi, Department of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan
Masahito Hitosugi, Department of Legal Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan
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Abstract
Brugada syndrome is a cardiac disorder characterized by typical ECG alterations, and it is associated with a high risk for sudden cardiac death, affecting young subjects with structurally normal hearts. The prevalence of this disorder is still uncertain, presenting marked geographical differences. The syndrome has a genetic basis, and several mutations have been identified in genes encoding subunits of cardiac sodium, potassium, and calcium channels, as well as in genes involved in the trafficking or regulation of these channels. We experienced an autopsy case of the sudden death by diagnosed Brugada syndrome. We present the case report and autopsic findings.
Keywords
Brugada Syndrome, Sudden Death, Coved and Saddleback Type ST Elevation, Autopsy, Histological Findings
To cite this article
Satoshi Furukawa, Satomu Morita, Hayato Okunaga, Lisa Wingenfeld, Akari Takaya, Tokiko Nakagawa, Ikuo Sakaguchi, Yoshio Yamamoto, Takasi Ashihara, Minoru Horie, Katsuji Nishi, Masahito Hitosugi, An Autopsic Examination Case of Diagnosed Brugada Syndrome, American Journal of Internal Medicine. Vol. 2, No. 4, 2014, pp. 79-82. doi: 10.11648/j.ajim.20140204.15
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