Association of the MYH9 Gene Polymorphisms with Chronic Renal Disease Secondary to Hypertensive Nephrosclerosis, in a Caucasian Population
American Journal of Internal Medicine
Volume 2, Issue 6, November 2014, Pages: 95-101
Received: Sep. 8, 2014; Accepted: Sep. 25, 2014; Published: Oct. 30, 2014
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Authors
Diez-Ojea Beatriz, Nephrology Service, Hospital Universitario De Torrevieja-Vinalopo, Alicante, Spain
Marin Rafael, Nephrology Service, Centro Médico De Asturias, Oviedo (Asturias), Spain
Coto Eliecer, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Hospital Universitario Central De Asturias, Oviedo (Asturias), Spain
Tavira Beatriz, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Hospital Universitario Central De Asturias, Oviedo (Asturias), Spain
Fernandez-Vega Francisco, Nephrology Service, Hospital Universitario Central De Asturias, Oviedo (Asturias), Spain
Alvarez Rafael, Nephrology Service, Hospital Universitario Central De Asturias, Oviedo (Asturias), Spain
Fernandez-Fresnedo Gema, Nephrology Service, Hospital Universitario Marqués De Valdecilla, Santander (Cantabria), Spain
Pobes Alfonso, Nephrology Service, Hospital Valle Del Nalón, Langreo (Asturias), Spain
Suarez-Laures Ana, Nephrology Service, Hospital De Cabueñes, Gijón (Asturias), Spain
Garcia-Monteavaro Camino, Nephrology Service, Hospital San Agustín, Avilés (Asturias), Spain
Gorostidi Manuel, Nephrology Service, Hospital Universitario Central De Asturias, Oviedo (Asturias), Spain
Sanchez Emilio, Nephrology Service, Hospital Universitario Central De Asturias, Oviedo (Asturias), Spain
Arias Manuel, Nephrology Service, Hospital Universitario Marqués De Valdecilla, Santander (Cantabria), Spain
Ortega Francisco, Nephrology Service, Hospital Universitario Central De Asturias, Oviedo (Asturias), Spain
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Abstract
Background: Hypertensive nephrosclerosis (HN) is a chronic kidney disease (CKD) associated to essential hypertension, but their causal relationship is controversial. New evidence suggests that MYH9 gene alterations are associated with HN in African Americans. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of this gene in Spanish Caucasians. Methods: We compare high-risk MYH9 variants of patients with HN recruited according to standard clinical criteria (CKD stages 3-5), with essential hypertensives without renal disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) > 60 ml/min/1,73m2 and albuminuria < 300 mg/g creatinine), and also CKD patients with HN and progressive impairment of renal function with those who were stable. Diabetics were excluded. Results: A blood sample was obtained for genetic study of 238 patients with HN-CKD and 233 hypertensive controls. The rs3752462-T and rs4821480-T (risk alleles for CKD) were more frequent in the CKD group, but without significant difference. We found no differences for these SPNs with blood pressure, creatinine, albuminuria or renal disease progression. Conclusions: The effect of two common MYH9 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SPNs) on the development of CKD secondary to HN in our Spanish Caucasian population is low or zero; in any case less than that found in other, mainly African Americans.
Keywords
Chronic Kidney Disease, Essential Hypertension, Hypertensive Nephrosclerosis, MYH9 Polymorphisms
To cite this article
Diez-Ojea Beatriz, Marin Rafael, Coto Eliecer, Tavira Beatriz, Fernandez-Vega Francisco, Alvarez Rafael, Fernandez-Fresnedo Gema, Pobes Alfonso, Suarez-Laures Ana, Garcia-Monteavaro Camino, Gorostidi Manuel, Sanchez Emilio, Arias Manuel, Ortega Francisco, Association of the MYH9 Gene Polymorphisms with Chronic Renal Disease Secondary to Hypertensive Nephrosclerosis, in a Caucasian Population, American Journal of Internal Medicine. Vol. 2, No. 6, 2014, pp. 95-101. doi: 10.11648/j.ajim.20140206.11
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